Blood Pressure (BP) and Heart Rate (HR) provide information on clin-ical condition along 24h. Both signals present circadian changes due to sympa-thetic/parasympathetic control system that influence the relationship between them. Moreover, also the gender could modify this relation, acting on both con-trol systems. Some studies, using office measurements examined the BP/HR re-lation, highlighting a direct association between the two variables, linked to sus-pected coronary heart disease. Nevertheless, till now such relation has not been studied yet using ambulatory technique that is known to lead to additional prog-nostic information about cardiovascular risks. In order to examine in a more ac-curate way this relation, in this work we evaluate the influence of gender on the BP/HR relationship by using hour-to-hour 24h ambulatory measurements. Data coming from 122 female and 50 male normotensive subjects were recorded using a Holter Blood Pressure Monitor and the parameters of the linear regression fit-ting BP/HR were calculated. Results confirmed those obtained in previous stud-ies using punctual office measures in males and underlined a significant relation between Diastolic BP and HR during each hour of the day in females; a different trend in the BP/HR relation between genders was found only during night-time. Moreover, the circadian rhythm of BP/HR is similar in both genders but with different values of HR and BP at different times of the day.

Influence of the gender on the relationship between heart rate and blood pressure

Giulia Silveri;Lorenzo Pascazio;Milos Ajcevic;Aleksandar Miladinovic;Agostino Accardo
2020-01-01

Abstract

Blood Pressure (BP) and Heart Rate (HR) provide information on clin-ical condition along 24h. Both signals present circadian changes due to sympa-thetic/parasympathetic control system that influence the relationship between them. Moreover, also the gender could modify this relation, acting on both con-trol systems. Some studies, using office measurements examined the BP/HR re-lation, highlighting a direct association between the two variables, linked to sus-pected coronary heart disease. Nevertheless, till now such relation has not been studied yet using ambulatory technique that is known to lead to additional prog-nostic information about cardiovascular risks. In order to examine in a more ac-curate way this relation, in this work we evaluate the influence of gender on the BP/HR relationship by using hour-to-hour 24h ambulatory measurements. Data coming from 122 female and 50 male normotensive subjects were recorded using a Holter Blood Pressure Monitor and the parameters of the linear regression fit-ting BP/HR were calculated. Results confirmed those obtained in previous stud-ies using punctual office measures in males and underlined a significant relation between Diastolic BP and HR during each hour of the day in females; a different trend in the BP/HR relation between genders was found only during night-time. Moreover, the circadian rhythm of BP/HR is similar in both genders but with different values of HR and BP at different times of the day.
https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-64610-3_77
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2975580
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