11 years ago, on 28 December 2005, was launched the Europe’s very first navigation satellite, GIOVE-A (Galileo In-Orbit Validation Element-A), thus starting the deployment of Galileo, the EU’s own global satellite navigation system. The deployment phase of Galileo suffered of many difficulties and delays but recently the Programme has been accelerated and, in the last months, the pace of deploying Europe’s own satellite navigation system continued to increase with the launch of the 18th Galileo satellite, on 17 November 2016. It is expected that the system will be fully operational by 2020, with actual implementation costs in the range of 5.23 billion of euros and 7 billion foreseen till 2020 for EGNOS e Galileo Projects. The excellent performances of Galileo satellites, as measured on the ground, “allows Europe to join the club of the worldwide providers of satellite navigation services”. Galileo will be integrated by EGNOS (European Geostationary Navigation Overlay service). Consisting of three geostationary satellites and a network of ground stations, EGNOS achieves its aim by transmitting a signal containing information on the reliability and accuracy of the positioning signals sent out by GPS. It allows users, in Europe and beyond, to determine their position to within 1.5 m (1σ). Since the first signals became available to users, demonstrations have shown the usefulness of EGNOS services in every type of kinematic application, in the aerial, maritime and terrestrial domain. As part of ‘GIANT’ (GNSS Introduction in the AviatioN sector), tests have proved the benefits of EGNOS when landing at airports with fewer aids or when helicopters make emergency landings. The integrity data provided by EGNOS is particularly suited for applications driven by stringent safety constraints during critical navigation phases such as landing aircraft, manoeuvring ships in narrow channels, and tracking the precise locations of trains. Actually many applications are based on EGNOS, and the Open Service (OS), available since October 2009, is widely used in the agricultural world, where it has proved valuable for reducing the use of fertilisers, thus helping to protect the environment. The accuracy of the Open Service has also proved useful to guide blind people in the city via mobile phones—like car drivers using GPS. Towards the certification of the Safety of Life service, many tests have been performed in the aviation, maritime and rail sectors. Mapping of fixed assets, controlling mining machinery and other professional uses are potential applications that could benefit from the EGNOS Commercial Data. Demonstrations showing the potential of EGNOS have been performed in many other sectors and many applications are just waiting to be thought of, such as for rail, road and maritime users. The European Commission (EC) estimates that 6–7% of European GDP (Gross Domestic Product)—around 800 billion by value—is already dependent on satellite navigation. Any GNSS device available on the marked is able to receive GPS, GLONASS and EGNOS signals and globally 40% of GNSS receivers are ready to receive Galileo signals. Multi-constellation services and receivers are used by millions of persons in the world, being part of their daily life, towards a future where geo-localisation of persons and things will become essential for safety and well-being. In this paper the current trend and benefits of multi-constellation services and receivers as well as innovative kinematic research applications, carried out by GeoSNav Lab, Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste, research team, using multi-constellation receivers, are presented.

The Actual Perspectives of GNSS Multi-constellation Services and Receivers for Kinematic Applications

CEFALO, RAFFAELA;CALDERAN, MAURO;FILIPPI, FRANCESCO;MONTEFUSCO, CRISTOFORO;PIEMONTE, ANDREA;SLUGA, TATIANA
2017-01-01

Abstract

11 years ago, on 28 December 2005, was launched the Europe’s very first navigation satellite, GIOVE-A (Galileo In-Orbit Validation Element-A), thus starting the deployment of Galileo, the EU’s own global satellite navigation system. The deployment phase of Galileo suffered of many difficulties and delays but recently the Programme has been accelerated and, in the last months, the pace of deploying Europe’s own satellite navigation system continued to increase with the launch of the 18th Galileo satellite, on 17 November 2016. It is expected that the system will be fully operational by 2020, with actual implementation costs in the range of 5.23 billion of euros and 7 billion foreseen till 2020 for EGNOS e Galileo Projects. The excellent performances of Galileo satellites, as measured on the ground, “allows Europe to join the club of the worldwide providers of satellite navigation services”. Galileo will be integrated by EGNOS (European Geostationary Navigation Overlay service). Consisting of three geostationary satellites and a network of ground stations, EGNOS achieves its aim by transmitting a signal containing information on the reliability and accuracy of the positioning signals sent out by GPS. It allows users, in Europe and beyond, to determine their position to within 1.5 m (1σ). Since the first signals became available to users, demonstrations have shown the usefulness of EGNOS services in every type of kinematic application, in the aerial, maritime and terrestrial domain. As part of ‘GIANT’ (GNSS Introduction in the AviatioN sector), tests have proved the benefits of EGNOS when landing at airports with fewer aids or when helicopters make emergency landings. The integrity data provided by EGNOS is particularly suited for applications driven by stringent safety constraints during critical navigation phases such as landing aircraft, manoeuvring ships in narrow channels, and tracking the precise locations of trains. Actually many applications are based on EGNOS, and the Open Service (OS), available since October 2009, is widely used in the agricultural world, where it has proved valuable for reducing the use of fertilisers, thus helping to protect the environment. The accuracy of the Open Service has also proved useful to guide blind people in the city via mobile phones—like car drivers using GPS. Towards the certification of the Safety of Life service, many tests have been performed in the aviation, maritime and rail sectors. Mapping of fixed assets, controlling mining machinery and other professional uses are potential applications that could benefit from the EGNOS Commercial Data. Demonstrations showing the potential of EGNOS have been performed in many other sectors and many applications are just waiting to be thought of, such as for rail, road and maritime users. The European Commission (EC) estimates that 6–7% of European GDP (Gross Domestic Product)—around 800 billion by value—is already dependent on satellite navigation. Any GNSS device available on the marked is able to receive GPS, GLONASS and EGNOS signals and globally 40% of GNSS receivers are ready to receive Galileo signals. Multi-constellation services and receivers are used by millions of persons in the world, being part of their daily life, towards a future where geo-localisation of persons and things will become essential for safety and well-being. In this paper the current trend and benefits of multi-constellation services and receivers as well as innovative kinematic research applications, carried out by GeoSNav Lab, Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste, research team, using multi-constellation receivers, are presented.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2910114
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