Soil characteristics play a key role for design and construction of transportation infrastructures. Subgrades of pavements must be adequately designed and realized to face stress-strain fields due to vehicles, withstanding traffic loading during construction and service life and limiting deformations to prevent the pavement failure. The evaluation of the soil bearing capacity can be performed through different laboratory and in situ tests, both static and dynamic. Among the existing methods, Light Falling Weight Deflectometer (LFWD), static plate-bearing load tests (PBLT), Dynamic Cone Penetrometer test (DCPT) and California Bearing Ratio (CBR) tests can be cited. LFWD can be quickly used, being it a simple and portable equipment suitable for determining the stiffness modulus of the soil. Static plate-bearing load tests can be carried out to measure the elastic vertical displacements, obtaining the so-called modulus of reaction or modulus of deformation as a function of the plate diameter and the stress path. DCP is used to measure the resistance against penetration of a soil through a simple test. Then, such characteristic is generally correlated to CBR using empirical correlations. As known, the bearing capacity of a soil is strictly related to its degree of compaction. Given this background, an attractive aspect from a scientific and technical perspective concerns the correlation among different methods and parameters to determine a general approach in considering the different data available for the design and control of a soil layer. To this regard, the present paper shows the results of an extensive in-situ survey and laboratory experimentation assessing the bearing capacity of soils through the above-mentioned techniques: a huge data-base permitted the development of some correlations between the different static and dynamic data.

Proposal of correlations between different soil bearing capacity parameters based on extesive test campaigns

Baliello A.
2018

Abstract

Soil characteristics play a key role for design and construction of transportation infrastructures. Subgrades of pavements must be adequately designed and realized to face stress-strain fields due to vehicles, withstanding traffic loading during construction and service life and limiting deformations to prevent the pavement failure. The evaluation of the soil bearing capacity can be performed through different laboratory and in situ tests, both static and dynamic. Among the existing methods, Light Falling Weight Deflectometer (LFWD), static plate-bearing load tests (PBLT), Dynamic Cone Penetrometer test (DCPT) and California Bearing Ratio (CBR) tests can be cited. LFWD can be quickly used, being it a simple and portable equipment suitable for determining the stiffness modulus of the soil. Static plate-bearing load tests can be carried out to measure the elastic vertical displacements, obtaining the so-called modulus of reaction or modulus of deformation as a function of the plate diameter and the stress path. DCP is used to measure the resistance against penetration of a soil through a simple test. Then, such characteristic is generally correlated to CBR using empirical correlations. As known, the bearing capacity of a soil is strictly related to its degree of compaction. Given this background, an attractive aspect from a scientific and technical perspective concerns the correlation among different methods and parameters to determine a general approach in considering the different data available for the design and control of a soil layer. To this regard, the present paper shows the results of an extensive in-situ survey and laboratory experimentation assessing the bearing capacity of soils through the above-mentioned techniques: a huge data-base permitted the development of some correlations between the different static and dynamic data.
978-86-916153-4-5
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11368/2956069
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