The Himalaya and Lhasa blocks act as the main belt of convergence and collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. Their crustal structures can be used to understand the dynamic process of continent– continent collision. Herein, we present a 3D crustal density model beneath these two tectonic blocks constrained by a review of all available active seismic and passive seismological results on the velocity structure of crust and lower lithosphere. From our final crustal density model, we infer that the present subduction-angle of the Indian plate is small, but presents some variations along the west–east extension of the orogenic belt: The dip angle of the Moho interface is about 8–9 in the eastern and western part of the orogenic belt, and about 16 in the central part. Integrating crustal P-wave velocity distribution from wide-angle seismic profiling, geothermal data and our crustal density model, we infer a crustal composition model, which is composed of an upper crust with granite–granodiorite and granite gneiss beneath the Lhasa block; biotite gneiss and phyllite beneath the Himalaya, a middle crust with granulite facies and possible pelitic gneisses, and a lower crust with gabbro–norite–troctolite and mafic granulite beneath the Lhasa block. Our density structure (<3.2 g/cm3) and composition (no fitting to eclogite) in the lower crust do not be favor to the speculation of ecologitized lower crust beneath Himalaya and the southern of Lhasa block.

Crustal density structure from 3D gravity modeling beneath Himalaya and Lhasa blocks, Tibet

BRAITENBERG, CARLA
2013-01-01

Abstract

The Himalaya and Lhasa blocks act as the main belt of convergence and collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. Their crustal structures can be used to understand the dynamic process of continent– continent collision. Herein, we present a 3D crustal density model beneath these two tectonic blocks constrained by a review of all available active seismic and passive seismological results on the velocity structure of crust and lower lithosphere. From our final crustal density model, we infer that the present subduction-angle of the Indian plate is small, but presents some variations along the west–east extension of the orogenic belt: The dip angle of the Moho interface is about 8–9 in the eastern and western part of the orogenic belt, and about 16 in the central part. Integrating crustal P-wave velocity distribution from wide-angle seismic profiling, geothermal data and our crustal density model, we infer a crustal composition model, which is composed of an upper crust with granite–granodiorite and granite gneiss beneath the Lhasa block; biotite gneiss and phyllite beneath the Himalaya, a middle crust with granulite facies and possible pelitic gneisses, and a lower crust with gabbro–norite–troctolite and mafic granulite beneath the Lhasa block. Our density structure (<3.2 g/cm3) and composition (no fitting to eclogite) in the lower crust do not be favor to the speculation of ecologitized lower crust beneath Himalaya and the southern of Lhasa block.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2672932
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