Objective: To assess the additional diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the characterization of indeterminate solid hepatic lesions identified on non-diagnostic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Methods: Fifty-five solid hepatic lesions (1–4 cm in diameter) in 46 non-cirrhotic patients (26 female, 20 male; age ± SD, 55 ± 10 years) underwent CEUS after being detected on contrast-enhanced CT which was considered as non-diagnostic after on-site analysis. Two blinded independent readers assessed CT and CEUS scans and were asked to classify retrospectively each lesion as a malignant or benign based on reference diagnostic criteria for the different hepatic lesion histotypes. Diagnostic accuracy and confidence (area – Az – under ROC curve) were assessed by using gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (n = 30 lesions), histology (n = 7 lesions), or US follow-up (n = 18 lesions) as the reference standards. Results: Final diagnoses included 29 hemangiomas, 3 focal nodular hyperplasias, 1 hepatocellular adenoma, and 22 metastases. The additional review of CEUS after CT images improved significantly (P < .05) the diagnostic accuracy (before vs after CEUS review = 49% [20/55] vs 89% [49/55] – reader 1 and 43% [24/55] vs 92% [51/55] – reader 2) and confidence (Az, 95% Confidence Intervals before vs after CEUS review = .773 [.652–.895] vs .997 [.987–1] – reader 1 and .831 [.724–.938] vs .998 [.992–1] – reader 2). Conclusions: CEUS improved the characterization of indeterminate solid hepatic lesions identified on non-diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT by identifying some specific contrast enhancement patterns.

Indeterminate solid hepatic lesions identified on non-diagnostic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: Assessment of the additional diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the non-cirrhotic liver

QUAIA, Emilio;COVA, MARIA ASSUNTA
2014-01-01

Abstract

Objective: To assess the additional diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the characterization of indeterminate solid hepatic lesions identified on non-diagnostic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Methods: Fifty-five solid hepatic lesions (1–4 cm in diameter) in 46 non-cirrhotic patients (26 female, 20 male; age ± SD, 55 ± 10 years) underwent CEUS after being detected on contrast-enhanced CT which was considered as non-diagnostic after on-site analysis. Two blinded independent readers assessed CT and CEUS scans and were asked to classify retrospectively each lesion as a malignant or benign based on reference diagnostic criteria for the different hepatic lesion histotypes. Diagnostic accuracy and confidence (area – Az – under ROC curve) were assessed by using gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (n = 30 lesions), histology (n = 7 lesions), or US follow-up (n = 18 lesions) as the reference standards. Results: Final diagnoses included 29 hemangiomas, 3 focal nodular hyperplasias, 1 hepatocellular adenoma, and 22 metastases. The additional review of CEUS after CT images improved significantly (P < .05) the diagnostic accuracy (before vs after CEUS review = 49% [20/55] vs 89% [49/55] – reader 1 and 43% [24/55] vs 92% [51/55] – reader 2) and confidence (Az, 95% Confidence Intervals before vs after CEUS review = .773 [.652–.895] vs .997 [.987–1] – reader 1 and .831 [.724–.938] vs .998 [.992–1] – reader 2). Conclusions: CEUS improved the characterization of indeterminate solid hepatic lesions identified on non-diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT by identifying some specific contrast enhancement patterns.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0720048X13006554
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2748711
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