It has previously been demonstrated that the circulating levels of TNF‑related apoptosis‑inducing ligand (TRAIL) are significantly lower in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) than in normal age- and gender‑matched controls. Since celiac disease (CD) is often associated with T1D, a retrospective study was performed to analyze the sera of a cohort of pediatric subjects: i) patients with CD at onset (n=100); ii) patients with potential CD (n=45); iii) patients with CD associated with other auto‑immune diseases (n=17); and iv) patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (n=15). Among the patients with CD, 49 were also analyzed after six months on a gluten‑free diet, while data were also available for 13 patients after one year on a gluten‑free diet. No significant differences were found in the circulating levels of TRAIL between the patients with CD and the patients with either eosinophilic esophagitis or potential CD. Patients with CD associated with other auto‑immune diseases showed significantly lower levels of TRAIL when compared with patients with CD alone. The gluten‑free diet did not significantly modify the levels of circulating TRAIL at 6 or 12 months. Thus, although T1D and CD share common immunological features, the circulating levels of TRAIL show a significant difference between the two pathologies, and do not appear to be modulated in CD.

Levels of circulating TNF‑related apoptosis‑inducing ligand in celiac disease

CELEGHINI, CLAUDIO;NOT, TARCISIO;
2014-01-01

Abstract

It has previously been demonstrated that the circulating levels of TNF‑related apoptosis‑inducing ligand (TRAIL) are significantly lower in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) than in normal age- and gender‑matched controls. Since celiac disease (CD) is often associated with T1D, a retrospective study was performed to analyze the sera of a cohort of pediatric subjects: i) patients with CD at onset (n=100); ii) patients with potential CD (n=45); iii) patients with CD associated with other auto‑immune diseases (n=17); and iv) patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (n=15). Among the patients with CD, 49 were also analyzed after six months on a gluten‑free diet, while data were also available for 13 patients after one year on a gluten‑free diet. No significant differences were found in the circulating levels of TRAIL between the patients with CD and the patients with either eosinophilic esophagitis or potential CD. Patients with CD associated with other auto‑immune diseases showed significantly lower levels of TRAIL when compared with patients with CD alone. The gluten‑free diet did not significantly modify the levels of circulating TRAIL at 6 or 12 months. Thus, although T1D and CD share common immunological features, the circulating levels of TRAIL show a significant difference between the two pathologies, and do not appear to be modulated in CD.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2819526
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