To understand the role of the motor cortex in implicit and explicit learning, we studied alpha event-related desynchronization (ERD) while 13 right-handed individuals performed a variation of the serial reaction time task (SRTT). EEG signals were recorded simultaneously from 29 scalp locations and the ERD was computed. During data collection, all subjects developed implicit knowledge, demonstrated by shortening of the response time, and explicit knowledge of the test sequence. The average ERD maps of all 13 subjects demonstrated that during the initial learning, there was a decline in alpha band power that was maximal over the contralateral central region. The ERD reached a transient peak amplitude at a point when the subjects attained full explicit knowledge, and diminished subsequently. The transient peak in ERD was highly significant at C3. These electrophysiologic findings support previous studies which have demonstrated that motor activity changes as behavior changes over the course of learning.

Event-related desynchronization (ERD) in the alpha frequency during development of implicit and explicit learning

MANGANOTTI, PAOLO;
1997-01-01

Abstract

To understand the role of the motor cortex in implicit and explicit learning, we studied alpha event-related desynchronization (ERD) while 13 right-handed individuals performed a variation of the serial reaction time task (SRTT). EEG signals were recorded simultaneously from 29 scalp locations and the ERD was computed. During data collection, all subjects developed implicit knowledge, demonstrated by shortening of the response time, and explicit knowledge of the test sequence. The average ERD maps of all 13 subjects demonstrated that during the initial learning, there was a decline in alpha band power that was maximal over the contralateral central region. The ERD reached a transient peak amplitude at a point when the subjects attained full explicit knowledge, and diminished subsequently. The transient peak in ERD was highly significant at C3. These electrophysiologic findings support previous studies which have demonstrated that motor activity changes as behavior changes over the course of learning.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2832976
 Avviso

Registrazione in corso di verifica.
La registrazione di questo prodotto non è ancora stata validata in ArTS.

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 20
  • Scopus 98
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 92
social impact