Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can transiently modulate cortical excitability, with a net effect depending on the stimulation frequency (</=1 Hz inhibition vs. >/=5 Hz facilitation, at least for the motor cortex). This possibility has generated interest in experiments aiming to improve deficits in clinical settings, as well as deficits in the cognitive domain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the on-line effects of low frequency (1 Hz) TMS on the EEG oscillatory activity in the healthy human brain, focusing particularly on the outcome of these modulatory effects in relation to the duration of the TMS stimulation. To this end, we used the event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) approach to determine the patterns of oscillatory activity during two consecutive trains of sham and real TMS. Each train of stimulation was delivered to the left primary motor cortex (MI) of healthy subjects over a period of 10 min, while EEG rhythms were simultaneously recorded. Results indicated that TMS induced an increase in the power of brain rhythms that was related to the period of the stimulation, i.e. the synchronization of the alpha band increased with the duration of the stimulation, and this increase was inversely correlated with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) amplitude. In conclusion, low frequency TMS over primary motor cortex induces a synchronization of the background oscillatory activity on the stimulated region. This induced modulation in brain oscillations seems to increase coherently with the duration of stimulation, suggesting that TMS effects may involve short-term modification of the neural circuitry sustaining MEPs characteristics.

Modulation of cortical oscillatory activity during transcranial magnetic stimulation

MANGANOTTI, PAOLO;
2008

Abstract

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can transiently modulate cortical excitability, with a net effect depending on the stimulation frequency (/=5 Hz facilitation, at least for the motor cortex). This possibility has generated interest in experiments aiming to improve deficits in clinical settings, as well as deficits in the cognitive domain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the on-line effects of low frequency (1 Hz) TMS on the EEG oscillatory activity in the healthy human brain, focusing particularly on the outcome of these modulatory effects in relation to the duration of the TMS stimulation. To this end, we used the event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) approach to determine the patterns of oscillatory activity during two consecutive trains of sham and real TMS. Each train of stimulation was delivered to the left primary motor cortex (MI) of healthy subjects over a period of 10 min, while EEG rhythms were simultaneously recorded. Results indicated that TMS induced an increase in the power of brain rhythms that was related to the period of the stimulation, i.e. the synchronization of the alpha band increased with the duration of the stimulation, and this increase was inversely correlated with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) amplitude. In conclusion, low frequency TMS over primary motor cortex induces a synchronization of the background oscillatory activity on the stimulated region. This induced modulation in brain oscillations seems to increase coherently with the duration of stimulation, suggesting that TMS effects may involve short-term modification of the neural circuitry sustaining MEPs characteristics.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11368/2832990
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