Introduction Porous tantalum presents a bone-matched elastic modulus and an high coefficient of friction on cancellous and cortical bone. Furthermore, its open-cell tantalum structure of repeating dodecahedrons, similar to cancellous bone, should be favourable for bone ingrowth. These physical and mechanical properties should increase primary fixation and potential osteointegration of acetabular cups and should decrease periacetabular stress shielding. The purpose of this study was to radiographically evaluate the evolution of the metal-bone interface of porous tantalum acetabular components. Materials and Methods Serial radiographic evaluation of 41porous tantalum acetabular component has been performed in 40 patients. Twelve hips underwent total hip arthroplasty using a trabecular metal monoblock acetabular component and 29 hips using a trabecular metal modular acetabular system. All patients were clinically and radiographically evaluated at four, eight, 12, 24 weeks, 12 months and then annually. All cases were available for a minimum follow-up of two years (mean 35 months). On post-operative x-rays the metal-bone interface was investigated for areas in which the porous surface of the acetabular component was not in contact with bone. These gaps were measured and classified by location according to DeLee and Charnley zones. Evolution of postoperative gaps, presence of lysis or periacetabular radiolucencies and component migration were assessed during follow-up. Results On post-operative x-rays 36 components (88%) had a gap between the outer surface and the host bone but only in 12 cases (29%) gaps were larger then 1 mm. The gaps were mostly situated in the polar region (zone II) when compared with the peripheral zones and no one was bigger then 5 mm in width. At last follow-up 23 (64%) of the initial gaps were no longer radiographically evident, 10 (28%) had a favourable evolution and appeared reduced in dimension but still present and 3 (8%) didn’t fill at all and were unchanged when compared with post-operative controls. There was no progression progression of any post-operative gap and no evidence of new periacetabular radiolucent lines or lysis. No acetabular implant showed evidence of migration or needed revision for loosening. At last follow up the mean Harris Hip Score was 95. There were no dislocation or other complications. Discussion Short term results with porous tantalum acetabular component are encouraging: the bridging of the interface gaps and the absence of periacetabular radiolucencies indicate good mechanical and osteoconductive properties. Further follow-up will be required to confirm these results in the long term.

Radiological evaluation of the metal-bone interface of a porous tantalum acetabular component

MURENA, LUIGI;
2007

Abstract

Introduction Porous tantalum presents a bone-matched elastic modulus and an high coefficient of friction on cancellous and cortical bone. Furthermore, its open-cell tantalum structure of repeating dodecahedrons, similar to cancellous bone, should be favourable for bone ingrowth. These physical and mechanical properties should increase primary fixation and potential osteointegration of acetabular cups and should decrease periacetabular stress shielding. The purpose of this study was to radiographically evaluate the evolution of the metal-bone interface of porous tantalum acetabular components. Materials and Methods Serial radiographic evaluation of 41porous tantalum acetabular component has been performed in 40 patients. Twelve hips underwent total hip arthroplasty using a trabecular metal monoblock acetabular component and 29 hips using a trabecular metal modular acetabular system. All patients were clinically and radiographically evaluated at four, eight, 12, 24 weeks, 12 months and then annually. All cases were available for a minimum follow-up of two years (mean 35 months). On post-operative x-rays the metal-bone interface was investigated for areas in which the porous surface of the acetabular component was not in contact with bone. These gaps were measured and classified by location according to DeLee and Charnley zones. Evolution of postoperative gaps, presence of lysis or periacetabular radiolucencies and component migration were assessed during follow-up. Results On post-operative x-rays 36 components (88%) had a gap between the outer surface and the host bone but only in 12 cases (29%) gaps were larger then 1 mm. The gaps were mostly situated in the polar region (zone II) when compared with the peripheral zones and no one was bigger then 5 mm in width. At last follow-up 23 (64%) of the initial gaps were no longer radiographically evident, 10 (28%) had a favourable evolution and appeared reduced in dimension but still present and 3 (8%) didn’t fill at all and were unchanged when compared with post-operative controls. There was no progression progression of any post-operative gap and no evidence of new periacetabular radiolucent lines or lysis. No acetabular implant showed evidence of migration or needed revision for loosening. At last follow up the mean Harris Hip Score was 95. There were no dislocation or other complications. Discussion Short term results with porous tantalum acetabular component are encouraging: the bridging of the interface gaps and the absence of periacetabular radiolucencies indicate good mechanical and osteoconductive properties. Further follow-up will be required to confirm these results in the long term.
http://link.springer.com/journal/10195/8/1/suppl/page/1
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11368/2833144
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