Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an established therapeutic procedure for several congenital and acquired disorders, both malignant and nonmalignant. Despite the great improvements in HSCT clinical practices over the last few decades, complications, such as graft vs. host disease (GVHD) and sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS), are still largely unpredictable and remain the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Both donor and patient genetic background might influence the success of bone marrow transplantation and could at least partially explain the inter-individual variability in HSCT outcome. This review summarizes some of the recent studies on candidate gene polymorphisms in HSCT, with particular reference to pediatric cohorts. The interest is especially focused on pharmacogenetic variants affecting myeloablative and immunosuppressive drugs, although genetic traits involved in SOS susceptibility and transplant-related mortality are also reviewed.

Role of Pharmacogenetics in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Outcome in Children

Franca, Raffaella;STOCCO, GABRIELE;GIURICI, NAGUA;DECORTI, GIULIANA;
2015

Abstract

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an established therapeutic procedure for several congenital and acquired disorders, both malignant and nonmalignant. Despite the great improvements in HSCT clinical practices over the last few decades, complications, such as graft vs. host disease (GVHD) and sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS), are still largely unpredictable and remain the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Both donor and patient genetic background might influence the success of bone marrow transplantation and could at least partially explain the inter-individual variability in HSCT outcome. This review summarizes some of the recent studies on candidate gene polymorphisms in HSCT, with particular reference to pediatric cohorts. The interest is especially focused on pharmacogenetic variants affecting myeloablative and immunosuppressive drugs, although genetic traits involved in SOS susceptibility and transplant-related mortality are also reviewed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11368/2845444
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