Objective To evaluate the association between hypoxaemia and mortality from acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in children in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Study Selection Observational studies reporting on the association between hypoxaemia and death from ALRI in children below five years in LMIC. Data Sources Medline, Embase, Global Health Library, Lilacs, and Web of Science to February 2015. Risk of Bias Assessment Quality In Prognosis Studies tool with minor adaptations to assess the risk of bias; funnel plots and Egger’s test to evaluate publication bias. Results Out of 11,627 papers retrieved, 18 studies from 13 countries on 20,224 children met the inclusion criteria. Twelve (66.6%) studies had either low or moderate risk of bias. Hypoxaemia defined as oxygen saturation rate (SpO2) <90% associated with significantly increased odds of death from ALRI (OR 5.47, 95% CI 3.93 to 7.63) in 12 studies on 13,936 children. An Sp02 <92% associated with a similar increased risk of mortality (OR 3.66, 95% CI 1.42 to 9.47) in 3 studies on 673 children. Sensitivity analyses (excluding studies with high risk of bias and using adjusted OR) and subgroup analyses (by: altitude, definition of ALRI, country income, HIV prevalence) did not affect results. Only one study was performed on children living at high altitude. Conclusions The results of this review support the routine evaluation of SpO2 for identifying children with ALRI at increased risk of death. Both a Sp02 value of 92% and 90% equally identify children at increased risk of mortality. More research is needed on children living at high altitude. Policy makers in LMIC should aim at improving the regular use of pulse oximetry and the availability of oxygen in order to decrease mortality from ALRI.

Hypoxaemia as a Mortality Risk Factor in Acute Lower Respiratory Infections in Children in Low and Middle-Income Countries: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

LAZZERINI, MARZIA;SONEGO, MICHELA;PELLEGRIN, MARIA CHIARA
2015

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the association between hypoxaemia and mortality from acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in children in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Study Selection Observational studies reporting on the association between hypoxaemia and death from ALRI in children below five years in LMIC. Data Sources Medline, Embase, Global Health Library, Lilacs, and Web of Science to February 2015. Risk of Bias Assessment Quality In Prognosis Studies tool with minor adaptations to assess the risk of bias; funnel plots and Egger’s test to evaluate publication bias. Results Out of 11,627 papers retrieved, 18 studies from 13 countries on 20,224 children met the inclusion criteria. Twelve (66.6%) studies had either low or moderate risk of bias. Hypoxaemia defined as oxygen saturation rate (SpO2) <90% associated with significantly increased odds of death from ALRI (OR 5.47, 95% CI 3.93 to 7.63) in 12 studies on 13,936 children. An Sp02 <92% associated with a similar increased risk of mortality (OR 3.66, 95% CI 1.42 to 9.47) in 3 studies on 673 children. Sensitivity analyses (excluding studies with high risk of bias and using adjusted OR) and subgroup analyses (by: altitude, definition of ALRI, country income, HIV prevalence) did not affect results. Only one study was performed on children living at high altitude. Conclusions The results of this review support the routine evaluation of SpO2 for identifying children with ALRI at increased risk of death. Both a Sp02 value of 92% and 90% equally identify children at increased risk of mortality. More research is needed on children living at high altitude. Policy makers in LMIC should aim at improving the regular use of pulse oximetry and the availability of oxygen in order to decrease mortality from ALRI.
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0136166
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11368/2845697
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