Hepatitis C virus is associated with chronic liver disease as well as with lymphoproliferative disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia and, likely, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The association between hepatitis C virus infection and B-cell lymphoma is controversial since it shows a strong regional variation. In fact, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma shows a prevalence ranging between 7.4 and 37.0%. However, the intimate pathogenetic mechanism involved in hepatitis C virus-associated lymphomas remains considerably unknown. Hepatitis C virus may exert its oncogenic potential via an indirect mechanism or utilise other pathways directly. It is reasonable to assume that several different pathogenetic mechanisms operate in the wide spectrum of hepatitis C virus-related lymphoproliferative disorders, which include the intermediate to high-grade lymphoma, and the more common indolent, low-grade lymphoma, preceded by long standing symptomatic mixed cryoglobulinemia Type II. In this review, the etiopathogenetic role of hepatitis C virus in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is discussed on the basis of molecular, clinical and epidemiological considerations. The management of hepatitis C virus-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is similar to that of conventional lymphoma, although viral reactivation or the underlying chronic liver disease can complicate chemotherapy. Whether to treat low-grade hepatitis C virus-related lymphomas with anti-viral therapy is still debatable, but encouraging data emerge from some recent studies

Hepatitis C virus and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma ten years later

POZZATO, GABRIELE
2005

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus is associated with chronic liver disease as well as with lymphoproliferative disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia and, likely, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The association between hepatitis C virus infection and B-cell lymphoma is controversial since it shows a strong regional variation. In fact, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma shows a prevalence ranging between 7.4 and 37.0%. However, the intimate pathogenetic mechanism involved in hepatitis C virus-associated lymphomas remains considerably unknown. Hepatitis C virus may exert its oncogenic potential via an indirect mechanism or utilise other pathways directly. It is reasonable to assume that several different pathogenetic mechanisms operate in the wide spectrum of hepatitis C virus-related lymphoproliferative disorders, which include the intermediate to high-grade lymphoma, and the more common indolent, low-grade lymphoma, preceded by long standing symptomatic mixed cryoglobulinemia Type II. In this review, the etiopathogenetic role of hepatitis C virus in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is discussed on the basis of molecular, clinical and epidemiological considerations. The management of hepatitis C virus-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is similar to that of conventional lymphoma, although viral reactivation or the underlying chronic liver disease can complicate chemotherapy. Whether to treat low-grade hepatitis C virus-related lymphomas with anti-viral therapy is still debatable, but encouraging data emerge from some recent studies
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11368/2855256
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