The Galactic habitable zone is defined as the region with highly enough metallicity to form planetary systems in which Earth-like planets could be born and might be capable of sustaining life surviving to the destructive effects of nearby supernova explosion events. Galactic chemical evolution models can be useful tools for studying the galactic habitable zones in different systems. Our aim here is to find the Galactic habitable zone using chemical evolution models for the Milky Way disc, adopting the most recent prescriptions for the evolution of dust and for the probability of finding planetary systems around M and FGK stars. Moreover, for the first time, we will express those probabilities in terms of the dust-to-gas ratio of the ISM in the solar neighborhood as computed by detailed chemical evolution models. At a fixed Galactic time and Galactocentric distance we determine the number of M and FGK stars having Earths (but no gas giant planets) which survived supernova explosions, using the formalism of our Paper I. The probabilities of finding terrestrial planets but not gas giant planets around M stars deviate substantially from the ones around FGK stars for supersolar values of [Fe/H]. For both FGK and M stars the maximum number of stars hosting habitable planets is at 8 kpc from the Galactic Centre, if destructive effects by supernova explosions are taken into account. At the present time the total number of M stars with habitable planets are ≃ 10 times the number of FGK stars. Moreover, we provide a sixth order polynomial fit (and a linear one but more approximated) for the relation found with chemical evolution models in the solar neighborhood between the [Fe/H] abundances and the dust-to-gas ratio.

Galactic habitable zone around M and FGK stars with chemical evolution models that include dust

SPITONI, EMANUELE;GIOANNINI, LORENZO;MATTEUCCI, MARIA FRANCESCA
2017-01-01

Abstract

The Galactic habitable zone is defined as the region with highly enough metallicity to form planetary systems in which Earth-like planets could be born and might be capable of sustaining life surviving to the destructive effects of nearby supernova explosion events. Galactic chemical evolution models can be useful tools for studying the galactic habitable zones in different systems. Our aim here is to find the Galactic habitable zone using chemical evolution models for the Milky Way disc, adopting the most recent prescriptions for the evolution of dust and for the probability of finding planetary systems around M and FGK stars. Moreover, for the first time, we will express those probabilities in terms of the dust-to-gas ratio of the ISM in the solar neighborhood as computed by detailed chemical evolution models. At a fixed Galactic time and Galactocentric distance we determine the number of M and FGK stars having Earths (but no gas giant planets) which survived supernova explosions, using the formalism of our Paper I. The probabilities of finding terrestrial planets but not gas giant planets around M stars deviate substantially from the ones around FGK stars for supersolar values of [Fe/H]. For both FGK and M stars the maximum number of stars hosting habitable planets is at 8 kpc from the Galactic Centre, if destructive effects by supernova explosions are taken into account. At the present time the total number of M stars with habitable planets are ≃ 10 times the number of FGK stars. Moreover, we provide a sixth order polynomial fit (and a linear one but more approximated) for the relation found with chemical evolution models in the solar neighborhood between the [Fe/H] abundances and the dust-to-gas ratio.
2017
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https://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/abs/2017/09/aa30545-17/aa30545-17.html
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2910150
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