Self-assembly methods allow to obtain ordered patterns on surfaces with exquisite precision, but often lack in effectiveness over large areas. Here we report on the realization of hierarchically ordered polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) nanofibres and nanodots over large areas from solution via a fast, easy and low-cost method named ASB-SANS, based on a ternary solution that is cast on the substrate. Simple changes to the ternary solution composition allow to control the transition from nanofibres to nanodots, via a wide range of intermediate topologies. The ternary solution includes the material to be patterned, a liquid solvent and a solid substance able to sublimate. The analysis of the fibres/dots width and inter-pattern distance variations with respect to the ratio between the solution components suggests that the macromolecular chains mobility in the solidified sublimating substance follows Zimm-like models (mobility of macromolecules in diluted liquid solutions). A qualitative explanation of the self-assembly phenomena originating the observed nanopatterns is given. Finally, ASB-SANSgenerated PMMA nanodots arrays have been used as lithographic masks for a silicon substrate and submitted to Inductively Coupled Plasma-Reactive Ion Etching (ICP-RIE). As a result, nanopillars with remarkably high aspect ratios have been achieved over areas as large as several millimeters square, highlighting an interesting potential of ASB-SANS in practical applications like photon trapping in photovoltaic cells, surface-enhanced sensors, plasmonics.

Controlled self-organization of polymer nanopatterns over large areas

Mohanraj, John;Dal Zilio, Simone;Fraleoni-Morgera, Alessandro
Writing – Review & Editing
2017-01-01

Abstract

Self-assembly methods allow to obtain ordered patterns on surfaces with exquisite precision, but often lack in effectiveness over large areas. Here we report on the realization of hierarchically ordered polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) nanofibres and nanodots over large areas from solution via a fast, easy and low-cost method named ASB-SANS, based on a ternary solution that is cast on the substrate. Simple changes to the ternary solution composition allow to control the transition from nanofibres to nanodots, via a wide range of intermediate topologies. The ternary solution includes the material to be patterned, a liquid solvent and a solid substance able to sublimate. The analysis of the fibres/dots width and inter-pattern distance variations with respect to the ratio between the solution components suggests that the macromolecular chains mobility in the solidified sublimating substance follows Zimm-like models (mobility of macromolecules in diluted liquid solutions). A qualitative explanation of the self-assembly phenomena originating the observed nanopatterns is given. Finally, ASB-SANSgenerated PMMA nanodots arrays have been used as lithographic masks for a silicon substrate and submitted to Inductively Coupled Plasma-Reactive Ion Etching (ICP-RIE). As a result, nanopillars with remarkably high aspect ratios have been achieved over areas as large as several millimeters square, highlighting an interesting potential of ASB-SANS in practical applications like photon trapping in photovoltaic cells, surface-enhanced sensors, plasmonics.
Pubblicato
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-09463-z
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Sci. Rep., 2017, 7, 10526.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 3.79 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
3.79 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
41598_2017_9463_MOESM1_ESM-2.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: supporting information
Tipologia: Altro materiale allegato
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 317.03 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
317.03 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2917381
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 3
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 3
social impact