BACKGROUND: Late survival of patients having deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) after bilateral internal thoracic artery (BITA) grafting is largely unexplored. METHODS: Outcomes of 3391 consecutive BITA patients were reviewed retrospectively. Patients with DSWI after surgery (n = 142, 4.2%) were compared with those having no sternal complications (n = 3177). Predictors of DSWI and of mortality during the follow-up period were found with negative-binomial and Cox proportional-hazards regression, respectively. One-to-one propensity score-matched analysis, which considered simultaneously baseline patient characteristics, operative data, and postoperative complications was performed. The resulting matched pairs were compared for non-parametric estimates of late survival. The same comparison was performed in matched pairs having no major complications (except DSWI) early after surgery. RESULTS: In-hospital mortality was higher in DSWI cohort than in patients having no sternal complications (5.6% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.0035). Almost all of postoperative complications were more frequent in DSWI patients. Female sex, obesity, chronic lung disease, renal impairment, extracardiac arteriopathy, congestive heart failure, and urgent/emergency priority were predictors of DSWI common to two DSWI risk models that were developed. DSWI was independent predictor of reduced late survival (multiple covariates-adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.91, p < 0.0001). The propensity matching resulted in 135 pairs with same in-hospital mortality (5.2%). Estimates of freedom from all-cause death were lower in DSWI cohort (HR, 1.92, p < 0.0001), even when only pairs (n = 59) having no major postoperative complications (except DSWI) were considered (HR, 1.84, p = 0.026). CONCLUSIONS: DSWI after BITA use seems to reduce late survival even after adjusting for baseline patient characteristics and concomitant postoperative complications.

The fate of patients having deep sternal infection after bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting in the negative pressure wound therapy era

Gatti, Giuseppe
;
Porcari, Aldostefano;BIONDI, FEDERICO;Luzzati, Roberto;Sinagra, Gianfranco;
2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Late survival of patients having deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) after bilateral internal thoracic artery (BITA) grafting is largely unexplored. METHODS: Outcomes of 3391 consecutive BITA patients were reviewed retrospectively. Patients with DSWI after surgery (n = 142, 4.2%) were compared with those having no sternal complications (n = 3177). Predictors of DSWI and of mortality during the follow-up period were found with negative-binomial and Cox proportional-hazards regression, respectively. One-to-one propensity score-matched analysis, which considered simultaneously baseline patient characteristics, operative data, and postoperative complications was performed. The resulting matched pairs were compared for non-parametric estimates of late survival. The same comparison was performed in matched pairs having no major complications (except DSWI) early after surgery. RESULTS: In-hospital mortality was higher in DSWI cohort than in patients having no sternal complications (5.6% vs. 1.8%, p = 0.0035). Almost all of postoperative complications were more frequent in DSWI patients. Female sex, obesity, chronic lung disease, renal impairment, extracardiac arteriopathy, congestive heart failure, and urgent/emergency priority were predictors of DSWI common to two DSWI risk models that were developed. DSWI was independent predictor of reduced late survival (multiple covariates-adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.91, p < 0.0001). The propensity matching resulted in 135 pairs with same in-hospital mortality (5.2%). Estimates of freedom from all-cause death were lower in DSWI cohort (HR, 1.92, p < 0.0001), even when only pairs (n = 59) having no major postoperative complications (except DSWI) were considered (HR, 1.84, p = 0.026). CONCLUSIONS: DSWI after BITA use seems to reduce late survival even after adjusting for baseline patient characteristics and concomitant postoperative complications.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2935204
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