Background and purpose In radiation therapy, defining the precise borders of cancerous tissues and adjacent normal organs has a significant effect on the therapy outcome. Deformable models offer a unique and robust approach to medical image segmentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability of segmenting organs-at-risk (OARs) using three well-known local region-based level-set techniques. Methods and materials A total of 1340 non-enhanced and enhanced planning computed tomography (CT) slices of eight OARs (the bladder, rectum, kidney, clavicle, humeral head, femoral head, spinal cord, and lung) were segmented by using local region-based active contour, local Chan-Vese, and local Gaussian distribution models. Quantitative metrics, namely Hausdorff Distance (HD), Mean Absolute Distance (MAD), Dice coefficient (DC), Percentage Volume Difference (PVD) and Absolute Volumetric Difference (AVD), were adopted to measure the correspondence between detected contours and the manual references drawn by experts. Results The results showed the feasibility of using local region-based active contour methods for defining six of the OARs (the bladder, kidney, clavicle, humeral head, spinal cord, and lung) when adequate intensity information is available. While the most accurate results were achieved for lung (DC = 0.94) and humeral head (DC = 0.92), a poor level of agreement (DC < 0.7) was obtained for both rectum and femur. Conclusion Incorporating local statistical information in level set methods yields to satisfactory results of OARs delineation when adequate intensity information exists between the organs. However, the complexity of adjacent organs and the lack of distinct boundaries would result in a considerable segmentation error.

Evaluation of localized region-based segmentation algorithms for CT-based delineation of organs at risk in radiotherapy

Severgnini, Mara;Milan, Vittorino;de Denaro, Mario;Aslian, Hossein
2018-01-01

Abstract

Background and purpose In radiation therapy, defining the precise borders of cancerous tissues and adjacent normal organs has a significant effect on the therapy outcome. Deformable models offer a unique and robust approach to medical image segmentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability of segmenting organs-at-risk (OARs) using three well-known local region-based level-set techniques. Methods and materials A total of 1340 non-enhanced and enhanced planning computed tomography (CT) slices of eight OARs (the bladder, rectum, kidney, clavicle, humeral head, femoral head, spinal cord, and lung) were segmented by using local region-based active contour, local Chan-Vese, and local Gaussian distribution models. Quantitative metrics, namely Hausdorff Distance (HD), Mean Absolute Distance (MAD), Dice coefficient (DC), Percentage Volume Difference (PVD) and Absolute Volumetric Difference (AVD), were adopted to measure the correspondence between detected contours and the manual references drawn by experts. Results The results showed the feasibility of using local region-based active contour methods for defining six of the OARs (the bladder, kidney, clavicle, humeral head, spinal cord, and lung) when adequate intensity information is available. While the most accurate results were achieved for lung (DC = 0.94) and humeral head (DC = 0.92), a poor level of agreement (DC < 0.7) was obtained for both rectum and femur. Conclusion Incorporating local statistical information in level set methods yields to satisfactory results of OARs delineation when adequate intensity information exists between the organs. However, the complexity of adjacent organs and the lack of distinct boundaries would result in a considerable segmentation error.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2947355
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