Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents one of the most common but scarcely known malignancies worldwide. The etiology of OSCC is strongly related to lifestyle habits and behavior, especially tobacco smoking and alcohol abuse. The mean age of individuals who start smoking and drinking alcohol is decreasing; thus, the aim of our campaign was to test the awareness and increase knowledge of oral cancer and its risk factors among young preadolescents. Six schools with 460 students aged 12–14 years were included in the campaign. A lecture about carcinogenesis and oral cancer was provided. Anonymous questionnaires were submitted to the students before and after the lecture, to test their knowledge, awareness, and understanding. Before the lecture, the students showed very little awareness of oral cancer (26.8%), although almost all of them identified tobacco smoking as a risk factor (92.2%). After the lecture, the students showed a significant understanding of the provided information, thus increasing their awareness. On scales of 1–10, the students rated the appropriateness of the campaign at 8.9 and their overall appreciation at 8.7. Social campaigns, especially among young students, seem to be appreciated and may represent a powerful strategy for increasing knowledge about cancer risk factors, especially when they are highly related to lifestyle habits and behavior.

Campaign to Increase Awareness of Oral Cancer Risk Factors Among Preadolescents

Rupel K.
;
Ottaviani G.;Gobbo M.;Poropat A.;Zoi V.;Zacchigna S.;Di Lenarda R.;Biasotto M.
2020-01-01

Abstract

Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents one of the most common but scarcely known malignancies worldwide. The etiology of OSCC is strongly related to lifestyle habits and behavior, especially tobacco smoking and alcohol abuse. The mean age of individuals who start smoking and drinking alcohol is decreasing; thus, the aim of our campaign was to test the awareness and increase knowledge of oral cancer and its risk factors among young preadolescents. Six schools with 460 students aged 12–14 years were included in the campaign. A lecture about carcinogenesis and oral cancer was provided. Anonymous questionnaires were submitted to the students before and after the lecture, to test their knowledge, awareness, and understanding. Before the lecture, the students showed very little awareness of oral cancer (26.8%), although almost all of them identified tobacco smoking as a risk factor (92.2%). After the lecture, the students showed a significant understanding of the provided information, thus increasing their awareness. On scales of 1–10, the students rated the appropriateness of the campaign at 8.9 and their overall appreciation at 8.7. Social campaigns, especially among young students, seem to be appreciated and may represent a powerful strategy for increasing knowledge about cancer risk factors, especially when they are highly related to lifestyle habits and behavior.
2020
5-mar-2019
Pubblicato
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13187-019-01504-7
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Rupel2020_Article_CampaignToIncreaseAwarenessOfO.pdf

Accesso chiuso

Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Digital Rights Management non definito
Dimensione 286.09 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
286.09 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2958205
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 3
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact