It is now recognized that host microbiome, the community of microorganisms that colonize the animal body (e.g. microbiota) and their genomes, play an important role in the health status of all organisms, from nutrient processing to protection from disease. In particular, the complex, bilateral interactions between the host innate immune system and the microbiota are crucial in maintaining whole body homeostasis. The development of nanotechnology is raising concern on the potential impact of nanoparticles-NPs on human and environmental health. Titanium dioxide-nTiO2, one of the most widely NP in use, has been shown to affect the gut microbiota of mammals and fish, as well as to potentially alter microbial communities. In the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis, nTiO2 has been previously shown to interact with hemolymph components, thus resulting in immunomodulation. However, no information is available on the possible impact of NPs on the microbiome of marine organisms. Bivalves host high microbial abundance and diversity, and alteration of their microbiota, in both tissues and hemolymph, in response to stressful conditions has been linked to a compromised health status and susceptibility to diseases. In this work, the effects of nTiO2 exposure (100 μg/L, 4 days) on Mytilus hemolymph microbiota were investigated by 16S rRNA gene-based profiling. Immune parameters were also evaluated. Although hemolymph microbiota of control and nTiO2-treated mussels revealed a similar core composition, nTiO2 exposure affected the abundance of different genera, with decreases in some (e.g. Shewanella, Kistimonas, Vibrio) and increases in others (e.g. Stenotrophomonas). The immunomodulatory effects of nTiO2 were confirmed by the increase in the bactericidal activity of whole hemolymph. These represent the first data on the effects of NPs on the microbiome of marine invertebrates, and suggest that the shift in hemolymph microbiome composition induced by nTiO2 may result from the interplay between the microbiota and the immune system.

Exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles induces shifts in the microbiota composition of Mytilus galloprovincialis hemolymph

Pallavicini, Alberto;
2019

Abstract

It is now recognized that host microbiome, the community of microorganisms that colonize the animal body (e.g. microbiota) and their genomes, play an important role in the health status of all organisms, from nutrient processing to protection from disease. In particular, the complex, bilateral interactions between the host innate immune system and the microbiota are crucial in maintaining whole body homeostasis. The development of nanotechnology is raising concern on the potential impact of nanoparticles-NPs on human and environmental health. Titanium dioxide-nTiO2, one of the most widely NP in use, has been shown to affect the gut microbiota of mammals and fish, as well as to potentially alter microbial communities. In the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis, nTiO2 has been previously shown to interact with hemolymph components, thus resulting in immunomodulation. However, no information is available on the possible impact of NPs on the microbiome of marine organisms. Bivalves host high microbial abundance and diversity, and alteration of their microbiota, in both tissues and hemolymph, in response to stressful conditions has been linked to a compromised health status and susceptibility to diseases. In this work, the effects of nTiO2 exposure (100 μg/L, 4 days) on Mytilus hemolymph microbiota were investigated by 16S rRNA gene-based profiling. Immune parameters were also evaluated. Although hemolymph microbiota of control and nTiO2-treated mussels revealed a similar core composition, nTiO2 exposure affected the abundance of different genera, with decreases in some (e.g. Shewanella, Kistimonas, Vibrio) and increases in others (e.g. Stenotrophomonas). The immunomodulatory effects of nTiO2 were confirmed by the increase in the bactericidal activity of whole hemolymph. These represent the first data on the effects of NPs on the microbiome of marine invertebrates, and suggest that the shift in hemolymph microbiome composition induced by nTiO2 may result from the interplay between the microbiota and the immune system.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2960282
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