An incorrect food regimen from childhood is suggested to negatively impact the gut microbiome composition leading to obesity and perhaps to colon rectal cancer (CRC) in adults. In this study, we show that the obesity and cancer gut microbiota share a characteristic microbial profile with a high colonization by mucin degraders species, such as Hafnia alvei and Akkermansia muciniphila. In addition, the species Clostridium bolteae, a bacterium associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and inflammation, has been associated with the presence of oncogenic Human Polyomaviruses (HPyVs). Merkel cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) and BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV) were the most frequently oncogenic viruses recovered in the gut of both obese and tumor patients. Considering the high seroprevalence of HPyVs in childhood, their association with specific bacterial species deserve to be further investigated. Data from the present study highlight the presence of a similar microbiome pattern in CRC and obese subjects, suggesting that obese microbiome may represent an opportunity for tumorigenic/driver bacteria and viruses to trigger cell transformation.

The obesity-related gut bacterial and viral dysbiosis can impact the risk of colon cancer development

Campisciano G.;de Manzini N.;Cason C.;Cosola D.;Comar M.;Palmisano S.
2020-01-01

Abstract

An incorrect food regimen from childhood is suggested to negatively impact the gut microbiome composition leading to obesity and perhaps to colon rectal cancer (CRC) in adults. In this study, we show that the obesity and cancer gut microbiota share a characteristic microbial profile with a high colonization by mucin degraders species, such as Hafnia alvei and Akkermansia muciniphila. In addition, the species Clostridium bolteae, a bacterium associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and inflammation, has been associated with the presence of oncogenic Human Polyomaviruses (HPyVs). Merkel cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) and BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV) were the most frequently oncogenic viruses recovered in the gut of both obese and tumor patients. Considering the high seroprevalence of HPyVs in childhood, their association with specific bacterial species deserve to be further investigated. Data from the present study highlight the presence of a similar microbiome pattern in CRC and obese subjects, suggesting that obese microbiome may represent an opportunity for tumorigenic/driver bacteria and viruses to trigger cell transformation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2961928
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