With the increased prevalence of chronic diseases, non-healing wounds place a significant burden on the health system and the quality of life of affected patients. Non-healing wounds are full-thickness skin lesions that persist for months or years. While several factors contribute to their pathogenesis, all non-healing wounds consistently demonstrate inadequate vascularization, resulting in the poor supply of oxygen, nutrients, and growth factors at the level of the lesion. Most existing therapies rely on the use of dermal substitutes, which help the re-epithelialization of the lesion by mimicking a pro-regenerative extracellular matrix. However, in most patients, this approach is not efficient, as non-healing wounds principally affect individuals afflicted with vascular disorders, such as peripheral artery disease and/or diabetes. Over the last 25 years, innovative therapies have been proposed with the aim of fostering the regenerative potential of multiple immune cell types. This can be achieved by promoting cell mobilization into the circulation, their recruitment to the wound site, modulation of their local activity, or their direct injection into the wound. In this review, we summarize preclinical and clinical studies that have explored the potential of various populations of immune cells to promote skin regeneration in non-healing wounds and critically discuss the current limitations that prevent the adoption of these therapies in the clinics.

Immune Cell Therapies to Improve Regeneration and Revascularization of Non-Healing Wounds

Colliva A.;Vuerich R.;Zacchigna S.
2020-01-01

Abstract

With the increased prevalence of chronic diseases, non-healing wounds place a significant burden on the health system and the quality of life of affected patients. Non-healing wounds are full-thickness skin lesions that persist for months or years. While several factors contribute to their pathogenesis, all non-healing wounds consistently demonstrate inadequate vascularization, resulting in the poor supply of oxygen, nutrients, and growth factors at the level of the lesion. Most existing therapies rely on the use of dermal substitutes, which help the re-epithelialization of the lesion by mimicking a pro-regenerative extracellular matrix. However, in most patients, this approach is not efficient, as non-healing wounds principally affect individuals afflicted with vascular disorders, such as peripheral artery disease and/or diabetes. Over the last 25 years, innovative therapies have been proposed with the aim of fostering the regenerative potential of multiple immune cell types. This can be achieved by promoting cell mobilization into the circulation, their recruitment to the wound site, modulation of their local activity, or their direct injection into the wound. In this review, we summarize preclinical and clinical studies that have explored the potential of various populations of immune cells to promote skin regeneration in non-healing wounds and critically discuss the current limitations that prevent the adoption of these therapies in the clinics.
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https://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/21/15/5235
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2969968
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