We present a measurement of the Hubble constant $H_0$ using the gravitational wave (GW) event GW190814, which resulted from the coalescence of a 23 $M_odot$ black hole with a 2.6 $M_odot$ compact object, as a standard siren. No compelling electromagnetic counterpart with associated host galaxy has been identified for this event, thus our analysis accounts for $sim$ 2,700 potential host galaxies within a statistical framework. The redshift information is obtained from the photometric redshift (photo-$z$) catalog from the Dark Energy Survey. The luminosity distance is provided by the gravitational wave sky map published by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration. Since this GW event has the second-smallest sky localization area after GW170817, GW190814 is likely to provide the best constraint on cosmology from a single standard siren without identifying an electromagnetic counterpart. Our analysis uses photo-$z$ probability distribution functions and corrects for photo-$z$ biases. We also reanalyze the binary-black hole GW170814 within this updated framework. We explore how our findings impact the $H_0$ constraints from GW170817, the only GW merger associated with a unique host galaxy, and therefore the most powerful standard siren to date. From a combination of GW190814, GW170814 and GW170817, our analysis yields $H_0 = 69.0^{+ 14}_{- 7.5 }~{ m km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$ (68% Highest Density Interval, HDI) for a prior in $H_0$ uniform between $[20,140]~{ m km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$. The addition of GW190814 and GW170814 to GW170817 improves the 68% HDI from GW170817 alone by $sim 12%$, showing how well-localized mergers without counterparts can provide a marginal contribution to standard siren measurements, provided that a complete galaxy catalog is available at the location of the event.

A statistical standard siren measurement of the Hubble constant from the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave compact object merger GW190814 and Dark Energy Survey galaxies

M. Costanzi;
2020-01-01

Abstract

We present a measurement of the Hubble constant $H_0$ using the gravitational wave (GW) event GW190814, which resulted from the coalescence of a 23 $M_odot$ black hole with a 2.6 $M_odot$ compact object, as a standard siren. No compelling electromagnetic counterpart with associated host galaxy has been identified for this event, thus our analysis accounts for $sim$ 2,700 potential host galaxies within a statistical framework. The redshift information is obtained from the photometric redshift (photo-$z$) catalog from the Dark Energy Survey. The luminosity distance is provided by the gravitational wave sky map published by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration. Since this GW event has the second-smallest sky localization area after GW170817, GW190814 is likely to provide the best constraint on cosmology from a single standard siren without identifying an electromagnetic counterpart. Our analysis uses photo-$z$ probability distribution functions and corrects for photo-$z$ biases. We also reanalyze the binary-black hole GW170814 within this updated framework. We explore how our findings impact the $H_0$ constraints from GW170817, the only GW merger associated with a unique host galaxy, and therefore the most powerful standard siren to date. From a combination of GW190814, GW170814 and GW170817, our analysis yields $H_0 = 69.0^{+ 14}_{- 7.5 }~{ m km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$ (68% Highest Density Interval, HDI) for a prior in $H_0$ uniform between $[20,140]~{ m km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$. The addition of GW190814 and GW170814 to GW170817 improves the 68% HDI from GW170817 alone by $sim 12%$, showing how well-localized mergers without counterparts can provide a marginal contribution to standard siren measurements, provided that a complete galaxy catalog is available at the location of the event.
2020
Pubblicato
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/abaeff
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2971431
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