Study objective: Early risk stratification of septic patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) is challenging. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic role of plasmatic sodium level (PNa+) derangements at ED presentation in septic patients. Methods: According to PNa+ at ED presentation patients were divided in eunatremic (136–145 mEq/L), hypernatremic (>145 mEq/L) and hyponatremic (<136 mEq/L). Hyponatremic patients were subsequently divided in mild (130–135 mEq/L), moderate (125–129 mEq/L) and severe (<125 mEq/L). 7 and 30-day mortality was evaluated according to PNa+ derangements and the degree of hyponatremia. The same analysis was then performed only in respiratory tract infection-related (RTI-r) sepsis patients. Results: 879 septic patients were included in this analysis, 40.3% had hyponatremia, 5.7% hypernatremia. Hypernatremia showed higher mortality rates at both endpoints compared to eunatremia and hyponatremia (p<0.0001 for both). Eunatremia and mild hyponatremia were compared vs. moderate-to-severe hyponatremia showing a significant difference in terms of 7 and 30-day survival (p = 0.004 and p = 0.007, respectively). The Cox proportional model identified as independent predictors of 7 and 30-day mortality moderate-to-severe hyponatremia (HR 4.89[2.38–10.03] and 1.79[1.07–3.01], respectively) and hypernatremia (HR 3.52[1.58–7.82] and 2.14[1.17–3.92], respectively). The same analysis was performed in patients with respiratory tract infection-related sepsis (n = 549), with similar results. Conclusion: Both hypernatremia and moderate-to-severe hyponatremia at ED presentation independently predict mortality in septic patients, allowing early risk stratification and suggesting more aggressive therapeutic strategies.

Hypernatremia and moderate-to-severe hyponatremia are independent predictors of mortality in septic patients at emergency department presentation: A sub-group analysis of the need-speed trial

Fiotti N.;Biolo G.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Study objective: Early risk stratification of septic patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) is challenging. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic role of plasmatic sodium level (PNa+) derangements at ED presentation in septic patients. Methods: According to PNa+ at ED presentation patients were divided in eunatremic (136–145 mEq/L), hypernatremic (>145 mEq/L) and hyponatremic (<136 mEq/L). Hyponatremic patients were subsequently divided in mild (130–135 mEq/L), moderate (125–129 mEq/L) and severe (<125 mEq/L). 7 and 30-day mortality was evaluated according to PNa+ derangements and the degree of hyponatremia. The same analysis was then performed only in respiratory tract infection-related (RTI-r) sepsis patients. Results: 879 septic patients were included in this analysis, 40.3% had hyponatremia, 5.7% hypernatremia. Hypernatremia showed higher mortality rates at both endpoints compared to eunatremia and hyponatremia (p<0.0001 for both). Eunatremia and mild hyponatremia were compared vs. moderate-to-severe hyponatremia showing a significant difference in terms of 7 and 30-day survival (p = 0.004 and p = 0.007, respectively). The Cox proportional model identified as independent predictors of 7 and 30-day mortality moderate-to-severe hyponatremia (HR 4.89[2.38–10.03] and 1.79[1.07–3.01], respectively) and hypernatremia (HR 3.52[1.58–7.82] and 2.14[1.17–3.92], respectively). The same analysis was performed in patients with respiratory tract infection-related sepsis (n = 549), with similar results. Conclusion: Both hypernatremia and moderate-to-severe hyponatremia at ED presentation independently predict mortality in septic patients, allowing early risk stratification and suggesting more aggressive therapeutic strategies.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2978773
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