Surgical site infections are the most common in-hospital acquired infections. The aim of this study and the primary endpoint is to evaluate how the measures to reduce the SARS-CoV-2 spreading affected the superficial and deep SSI rate. A total of 541 patients were included. Of those, 198 from March to April 2018, 220 from March till April 2019 and 123 in the COVID-19 era from March to April 2020. The primary endpoint occurred in 39 over 541 patients. In COVID-19 era, we reported a lower rate of global SSIs (3.3% vs. 8.4%; p 0.035), few patients developed a superficial SSIs (0.8% vs. 3.4%; p 0.018) and none experienced deep SSIs (0% vs. 3.4%; p 0.025). Comparing the previous two “COVID-19-free” years, no significative differences were reported. At multivariate analysis, the measures to reduce the SARS-CoV-2 spread (OR 0.368; p 0.05) were independently associated with the reduction for total, superficial and deep SSIs. Moreover, the presence of drains (OR 4.99; p 0.009) and a Type III–IV of SWC (OR 1.8; p 0.001) demonstrated a worse effect regarding the primary endpoint. Furthermore, the presence of the drain was not associated with an increased risk of superficial and deep SSIs. In this study, we provided important insights into the superficial and deep SSIs risk assessment for patients who underwent surgery. Simple and easily viable precautions such as wearing surgical masks and the restriction of visitors emerged as promising tools for the reduction of SSIs risk.

Impact of lockdown for SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) on surgical site infection rates: a monocentric observational cohort study

Losurdo P.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Paiano L.
Data Curation
;
Germani P.
Data Curation
;
Bernardi L.
Data Curation
;
Borelli M.
Methodology
;
de Manzini N.
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Bortul M.
Writing – Review & Editing
2020

Abstract

Surgical site infections are the most common in-hospital acquired infections. The aim of this study and the primary endpoint is to evaluate how the measures to reduce the SARS-CoV-2 spreading affected the superficial and deep SSI rate. A total of 541 patients were included. Of those, 198 from March to April 2018, 220 from March till April 2019 and 123 in the COVID-19 era from March to April 2020. The primary endpoint occurred in 39 over 541 patients. In COVID-19 era, we reported a lower rate of global SSIs (3.3% vs. 8.4%; p 0.035), few patients developed a superficial SSIs (0.8% vs. 3.4%; p 0.018) and none experienced deep SSIs (0% vs. 3.4%; p 0.025). Comparing the previous two “COVID-19-free” years, no significative differences were reported. At multivariate analysis, the measures to reduce the SARS-CoV-2 spread (OR 0.368; p 0.05) were independently associated with the reduction for total, superficial and deep SSIs. Moreover, the presence of drains (OR 4.99; p 0.009) and a Type III–IV of SWC (OR 1.8; p 0.001) demonstrated a worse effect regarding the primary endpoint. Furthermore, the presence of the drain was not associated with an increased risk of superficial and deep SSIs. In this study, we provided important insights into the superficial and deep SSIs risk assessment for patients who underwent surgery. Simple and easily viable precautions such as wearing surgical masks and the restriction of visitors emerged as promising tools for the reduction of SSIs risk.
Pubblicato
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13304-020-00884-6
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Losurdo2020_Article_ImpactOfLockdownForSARS-CoV-2C.pdf

non disponibili

Descrizione: Liberamente accessibile dal sito dell'editore
Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Copyright Editore
Dimensione 795.59 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
795.59 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2991235
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 18
  • Scopus 19
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 19
social impact