The skin constitutes a protective barrier to external physical and chemical aggressions. Although it is constantly exposed to various xenobiotics, it is generally considered poorly permeable to them, as for example metal ions, becoming unfortunately an entry route of such substances. Metals may penetrate inside the skin inducing more or less local effects such as skin sensitization and potential metals diffusion into the bloodstream. The objective of the study was to investigate the percutaneous penetration of metals in vitro - ex vivo in Franz cell with intact as well damaged skin applying a road dust powder. Moreover, porcine and human skins were compared. This study demonstrated that, after the application of a road dust powder on the skin, metals can penetrate and permeate this cutaneous membrane. From this experimental analysis, in intact skin lead (Pb) achieved the highest skin absorption in both human and porcine skin, while skin absorption profile of cobalt (Co) was the lowest in human skin than the one in porcine model. The concentrations of Ni present in receiving solution were higher compared to other metals in all experiments performed. The present work, definitely shows that metals permeation through damaged skin is accelerated than intact skin, as a result of the weaker cutaneous barrier function. According to published data, pig skin appeared as a suitable model for human skin. Our results confirmed that skin absorption of metals can be relevant in environmental exposures.

Percutaneous metals absorption following exposure to road dust powder

Magnano G. C.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Marussi G.
Data Curation
;
Pavoni E.
Investigation
;
Adami G.
Supervision
;
Larese Filon F.
Supervision
;
Crosera M.
Writing – Review & Editing
2022

Abstract

The skin constitutes a protective barrier to external physical and chemical aggressions. Although it is constantly exposed to various xenobiotics, it is generally considered poorly permeable to them, as for example metal ions, becoming unfortunately an entry route of such substances. Metals may penetrate inside the skin inducing more or less local effects such as skin sensitization and potential metals diffusion into the bloodstream. The objective of the study was to investigate the percutaneous penetration of metals in vitro - ex vivo in Franz cell with intact as well damaged skin applying a road dust powder. Moreover, porcine and human skins were compared. This study demonstrated that, after the application of a road dust powder on the skin, metals can penetrate and permeate this cutaneous membrane. From this experimental analysis, in intact skin lead (Pb) achieved the highest skin absorption in both human and porcine skin, while skin absorption profile of cobalt (Co) was the lowest in human skin than the one in porcine model. The concentrations of Ni present in receiving solution were higher compared to other metals in all experiments performed. The present work, definitely shows that metals permeation through damaged skin is accelerated than intact skin, as a result of the weaker cutaneous barrier function. According to published data, pig skin appeared as a suitable model for human skin. Our results confirmed that skin absorption of metals can be relevant in environmental exposures.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2999321
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