NAFLD is the most common cause of abnormality in liver function tests. NAFLD is considered a potential cardiovascular risk factor and is linked to cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Few previous studies have investigated whether NAFLD could be independently associated with cognitive impairment. The current study aims to find a possible role of NAFLD in the development of subcortical vascular dementia (sVaD). We considered NAFLD as a possible independent vascular risk factor or, considering its metabolic role, associated with other commonly accepted sVaD risk factors, i.e., lack of folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin D-OH25, and increased levels of homocysteine. We studied 319 patients diagnosed with sVaD. All patients underwent an abdominal ultrasound examination to classify steatosis into four levels (1—none up to 4—severe). sVaD patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of NAFLD. Our results demonstrated a strong correlation between NAFLD and sVaD. Patients with the two comorbidities had worse neuropsychological outcomes and a worse metabolic profile. We also found a robust relationship between NAFLD and severe vitamin B12, folate, vitamin D hypovitaminosis, and higher hyperhomocysteinemia levels. This way, it is evident that NAFLD contributes to a more severe metabolic pathway. However, the strong relationship with the three parameters (B12, folate and vitamin D, and homocysteinemia) suggests that NAFLD can contribute to a proinflammatory condition.

Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Altered Neuropsychological Functions in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Dementia

Moretti, Rita
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Crocè, Lory Saveria
Resources
;
Gazzin, Silvia
Conceptualization
;
Tiribelli, Claudio
Supervision
2022

Abstract

NAFLD is the most common cause of abnormality in liver function tests. NAFLD is considered a potential cardiovascular risk factor and is linked to cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Few previous studies have investigated whether NAFLD could be independently associated with cognitive impairment. The current study aims to find a possible role of NAFLD in the development of subcortical vascular dementia (sVaD). We considered NAFLD as a possible independent vascular risk factor or, considering its metabolic role, associated with other commonly accepted sVaD risk factors, i.e., lack of folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin D-OH25, and increased levels of homocysteine. We studied 319 patients diagnosed with sVaD. All patients underwent an abdominal ultrasound examination to classify steatosis into four levels (1—none up to 4—severe). sVaD patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of NAFLD. Our results demonstrated a strong correlation between NAFLD and sVaD. Patients with the two comorbidities had worse neuropsychological outcomes and a worse metabolic profile. We also found a robust relationship between NAFLD and severe vitamin B12, folate, vitamin D hypovitaminosis, and higher hyperhomocysteinemia levels. This way, it is evident that NAFLD contributes to a more severe metabolic pathway. However, the strong relationship with the three parameters (B12, folate and vitamin D, and homocysteinemia) suggests that NAFLD can contribute to a proinflammatory condition.
Pubblicato
https://www.mdpi.com/2075-4426/12/7/1106
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9323787/
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3026104
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