Background: Total body irradiation (TBI) is a mandatory step for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the past, amylases have been reported to be a possible sign of TBI toxicity. We investigated the relationship between total amylases (TA) and transplant-related outcomes in pediatric recipients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of all the patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT between January 2000 and November 2019. The inclusion criteria were the following: recipient's age between 2 and 18, diagnosis of ALL, no previous transplantation, and use of TBI-based conditioning. The serum total amylase and pancreatic amylase were evaluated before, during, and after transplantation. Cytokines and chemokines assays were retrospectively performed. Results: 78 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Fifty-seven patients were treated with fractionated TBI, and 21 with a single-dose regimen. The overall survival (OS) was 62.8%. Elevated values of TA were detected in 71 patients (91%). The TA were excellent in predicting the OS (AUC = 0.773; 95% CI = 0.66-0.86; p < 0.001). TA values below 374 U/L were correlated with a higher OS. The highest mean TA values (673 U/L) were associated with a high disease-progression mortality rate. The TA showed a high predictive performance for disease progression-related death (AUC = 0.865; 95% CI = 0.77-0.93; p < 0.0001). Elevated TA values were also connected with significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, IL-6, and RANTES (p < 0.001). Conclusions: this study shows that TA is a valuable predictor of post-transplant OS and increased risk of leukemia relapse.

Post-Irradiation Hyperamylasemia Is a Prognostic Marker for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Pediatric Population: A Retrospective Single-Centre Cohort Analysis

Baldo, Francesco;Simeone, Roberto;Marcuzzi, Annalisa;Vidimari, Rossella;Zanon, Davide;Maestro, Alessandra;Barbi, Egidio;Maximova, Natalia
2021

Abstract

Background: Total body irradiation (TBI) is a mandatory step for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the past, amylases have been reported to be a possible sign of TBI toxicity. We investigated the relationship between total amylases (TA) and transplant-related outcomes in pediatric recipients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of all the patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT between January 2000 and November 2019. The inclusion criteria were the following: recipient's age between 2 and 18, diagnosis of ALL, no previous transplantation, and use of TBI-based conditioning. The serum total amylase and pancreatic amylase were evaluated before, during, and after transplantation. Cytokines and chemokines assays were retrospectively performed. Results: 78 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Fifty-seven patients were treated with fractionated TBI, and 21 with a single-dose regimen. The overall survival (OS) was 62.8%. Elevated values of TA were detected in 71 patients (91%). The TA were excellent in predicting the OS (AUC = 0.773; 95% CI = 0.66-0.86; p < 0.001). TA values below 374 U/L were correlated with a higher OS. The highest mean TA values (673 U/L) were associated with a high disease-progression mortality rate. The TA showed a high predictive performance for disease progression-related death (AUC = 0.865; 95% CI = 0.77-0.93; p < 0.0001). Elevated TA values were also connected with significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, IL-6, and RANTES (p < 0.001). Conclusions: this study shows that TA is a valuable predictor of post-transplant OS and increased risk of leukemia relapse.
Pubblicato
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8432189/
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3026560
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