Objective: This series of articles, titled The Vaginal Microbiome (VMB), written on behalf of the International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease, aims to summarize the recent findings and understanding of the vaginal bacterial microbiota, mainly regarding areas relevant to clinicians specializing in vulvovaginal disorders. Materials and methods: A search of PubMed database was performed, using the search terms "vaginal microbiome" with "Candida," "vaginitis," "urinary microbiome," "recurrent urinary tract infections," "sexually transmitted infections," "human immunodeficiency virus," "human papillomavirus," "nonspecific vaginitis," "vulvodynia," and "vulvovaginal symptoms." Full article texts were reviewed. Reference lists were screened for additional articles. The third article in this series describes VMB in various urogenital disorders. Results: Variable patterns of the VMB are found in patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis, challenging the idea of a protective role of lactobacilli. Highly similar strains of health-associated commensal bacteria are shared in both the bladder and vagina of the same individual and may provide protection against urinary tract infections. Dysbiotic VMB increases the risk of urinary tract infection. Loss of vaginal lactic acid-producing bacteria combined with elevated pH, increase the risk for sexually transmitted infections, although the exact protective mechanisms of the VMB against sexually transmitted infections are still unknown. Conclusions: The VMB may constitute a biological barrier to pathogenic microorganisms. When the predominance of lactobacilli community is disrupted, there is an increased risk for the acquisition of various vaginal pathogents. Longitudinal studies are needed to describe the association between the host, bacterial, and fungal components of the VMB.

The Vaginal Microbiome: III. The Vaginal Microbiome in Various Urogenital Disorders

De Seta, Francesco;Campisciano, Giuseppina;Comar, Manola;
2022

Abstract

Objective: This series of articles, titled The Vaginal Microbiome (VMB), written on behalf of the International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease, aims to summarize the recent findings and understanding of the vaginal bacterial microbiota, mainly regarding areas relevant to clinicians specializing in vulvovaginal disorders. Materials and methods: A search of PubMed database was performed, using the search terms "vaginal microbiome" with "Candida," "vaginitis," "urinary microbiome," "recurrent urinary tract infections," "sexually transmitted infections," "human immunodeficiency virus," "human papillomavirus," "nonspecific vaginitis," "vulvodynia," and "vulvovaginal symptoms." Full article texts were reviewed. Reference lists were screened for additional articles. The third article in this series describes VMB in various urogenital disorders. Results: Variable patterns of the VMB are found in patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis, challenging the idea of a protective role of lactobacilli. Highly similar strains of health-associated commensal bacteria are shared in both the bladder and vagina of the same individual and may provide protection against urinary tract infections. Dysbiotic VMB increases the risk of urinary tract infection. Loss of vaginal lactic acid-producing bacteria combined with elevated pH, increase the risk for sexually transmitted infections, although the exact protective mechanisms of the VMB against sexually transmitted infections are still unknown. Conclusions: The VMB may constitute a biological barrier to pathogenic microorganisms. When the predominance of lactobacilli community is disrupted, there is an increased risk for the acquisition of various vaginal pathogents. Longitudinal studies are needed to describe the association between the host, bacterial, and fungal components of the VMB.
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https://journals.lww.com/jlgtd/Fulltext/2022/01000/The_Vaginal_Microbiome__III__The_Vaginal.17.aspx
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8719503/
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3027887
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