Objective: This series of articles, titled The Vaginal Microbiome (VMB), written on behalf of the International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease, aims to summarize the recent findings and understanding of the vaginal bacterial microbiota, mainly regarding areas relevant to clinicians specializing in vulvovaginal disorders. Materials and methods: A search of PubMed database was performed, using the search terms "vaginal microbiome" with "reproduction," "infertility," "fertility," "miscarriages," "pregnancy" "cervical cancer," "endometrial cancer," and "ovarian cancer." Full article texts were reviewed. Reference lists were screened for additional articles. Results: The fourth article of this series focuses on 2 distinct areas: the role of VMB in various aspects of human reproduction and, in sharp contrast, the association between the VMB and gynecologic malignancies. Several of the negative pregnancy outcomes have been associated with an altered VMB. Dysbiosis is remarkably linked with poor pregnancy outcomes from preconception to delivery. The associations between the microbiome and gynecologic cancers are described. Conclusions: The development of the microbiome research, enabled by molecular-based techniques, has dramatically increased the detection of microorganisms and the understanding of bacterial communities that are relevant to maternal-fetal medicine in health and disease, as well as in gynecological malignancies. Proving causation in cancer is difficult because of the complex interactive nature of potential causative factors. Certain elements of the microbiota have been shown to provoke inflammatory reactions, whereas others produce anti-inflammatory reactions; this balance might be impaired with a change in microbial variety.

The Vaginal Microbiome: IV. The Role of Vaginal Microbiome in Reproduction and in Gynecologic Cancers

De Seta, Francesco;
2022

Abstract

Objective: This series of articles, titled The Vaginal Microbiome (VMB), written on behalf of the International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease, aims to summarize the recent findings and understanding of the vaginal bacterial microbiota, mainly regarding areas relevant to clinicians specializing in vulvovaginal disorders. Materials and methods: A search of PubMed database was performed, using the search terms "vaginal microbiome" with "reproduction," "infertility," "fertility," "miscarriages," "pregnancy" "cervical cancer," "endometrial cancer," and "ovarian cancer." Full article texts were reviewed. Reference lists were screened for additional articles. Results: The fourth article of this series focuses on 2 distinct areas: the role of VMB in various aspects of human reproduction and, in sharp contrast, the association between the VMB and gynecologic malignancies. Several of the negative pregnancy outcomes have been associated with an altered VMB. Dysbiosis is remarkably linked with poor pregnancy outcomes from preconception to delivery. The associations between the microbiome and gynecologic cancers are described. Conclusions: The development of the microbiome research, enabled by molecular-based techniques, has dramatically increased the detection of microorganisms and the understanding of bacterial communities that are relevant to maternal-fetal medicine in health and disease, as well as in gynecological malignancies. Proving causation in cancer is difficult because of the complex interactive nature of potential causative factors. Certain elements of the microbiota have been shown to provoke inflammatory reactions, whereas others produce anti-inflammatory reactions; this balance might be impaired with a change in microbial variety.
Pubblicato
https://journals.lww.com/jlgtd/Fulltext/2022/01000/The_Vaginal_Microbiome__IV__The_Role_of_Vaginal.18.aspx
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8719507/
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11368/3027892
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