Objectives: During the past decades, there has been a shift in the clinical presentation of coeliac disease (CD) to nonclassical, oligosymptomatic, and asymptomatic forms. We assessed clinical presentation of CD in children and adolescents in Central Europe. Methods: Paediatric gastroenterologists in 5 countries retrospectively reported data of their patients diagnosed with CD. Clinical presentation was analyzed and the differences among very young (<3 years) and older children and adolescents were studied. Results: Data from 653 children and adolescents (median age 7 years 2 months; 63.9% girls) from Croatia, Germany, Hungary, Italy, and Slovenia were available for the analysis. One fifth (N = 134) of all children were asymptomatic. In symptomatic children, the most common leading symptom was abdominal pain (33.3%), followed by growth retardation (13.7%) and diarrhoea (13.3%). The majority of symptomatic children (47.6%; N = 247) were polysymptomatic. Abdominal pain was the most common symptom in polysymptomatic (66.4%) as well as in monosymptomatic children (29.7%). Comparing clinical presentation of CD in very young children (younger than 3 years) with older children (3 years or older), we found that symptoms and signs of malabsorption were significantly more common in younger (P < 0.001), whereas abdominal pain and asymptomatic presentation were more common in older children and adolescents (both P < 0.001). Conclusion: In children with CD, abdominal pain has become the most common symptom. However, in younger children, symptoms of malabsorption are still seen frequently. This raises a question about the underlying mechanism of observed change in clinical presentation in favour of nonclassical presentation and asymptomatic disease at certain age.

Clinical Presentation in Children With Coeliac Disease in Central Europe

De Leo, Luigina;Not, Tarcisio;Sblattero, Daniele;
2021

Abstract

Objectives: During the past decades, there has been a shift in the clinical presentation of coeliac disease (CD) to nonclassical, oligosymptomatic, and asymptomatic forms. We assessed clinical presentation of CD in children and adolescents in Central Europe. Methods: Paediatric gastroenterologists in 5 countries retrospectively reported data of their patients diagnosed with CD. Clinical presentation was analyzed and the differences among very young (<3 years) and older children and adolescents were studied. Results: Data from 653 children and adolescents (median age 7 years 2 months; 63.9% girls) from Croatia, Germany, Hungary, Italy, and Slovenia were available for the analysis. One fifth (N = 134) of all children were asymptomatic. In symptomatic children, the most common leading symptom was abdominal pain (33.3%), followed by growth retardation (13.7%) and diarrhoea (13.3%). The majority of symptomatic children (47.6%; N = 247) were polysymptomatic. Abdominal pain was the most common symptom in polysymptomatic (66.4%) as well as in monosymptomatic children (29.7%). Comparing clinical presentation of CD in very young children (younger than 3 years) with older children (3 years or older), we found that symptoms and signs of malabsorption were significantly more common in younger (P < 0.001), whereas abdominal pain and asymptomatic presentation were more common in older children and adolescents (both P < 0.001). Conclusion: In children with CD, abdominal pain has become the most common symptom. However, in younger children, symptoms of malabsorption are still seen frequently. This raises a question about the underlying mechanism of observed change in clinical presentation in favour of nonclassical presentation and asymptomatic disease at certain age.
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https://journals.lww.com/jpgn/Fulltext/2021/04000/Clinical_Presentation_in_Children_With_Coeliac.14.aspx
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11368/3028646
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