Introduction: No studies have reported data on 2-year prevalence and recovery rates of self-reported COVID-19-related quantitative and qualitative olfactory and gustatory dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to estimate the 2-year prevalence and recovery rate of self-reported COVID-19-related olfactory and gustatory dysfunction in a cohort of patients with antecedent mild-to-moderate disease. Methods: This is a prospective observational study, measuring the prevalence of altered sense of smell or taste at follow-up and their variation from baseline, on adult patients consecutively assessed at Trieste University Hospital, who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by polymerase chain reaction during March 2020. Results: Overall, 174 (68.8%), 53 (20.9%), and 36 (14.2%) of 253 responders reported an altered sense of smell or taste (SNOT-22 >0) at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months, respectively. Among the 174 patients who have complained a COVID-19-associated olfactory or gustatory dysfunction at baseline, 138 (79.3%) reported complete resolution of smell or taste impairment with 17 subjects (9.8%) recovering after more than 1 year after the initial infection, 33 (19.0%) reported a decrease in the severity, and only 3 (1.7%) reported that the symptom was unchanged at the 24-month interview. Twenty subjects (7.9%) complained of at least one qualitative long-term symptom. Conclusion: Two years after the infection, most patients experience a favourable evolution of COVID-19-related olfactory or gustatory dysfunction. A late recovery was observed in 10% of subjects.

COVID-19-Related Quantitative and Qualitative Olfactory and Gustatory Dysfunction: Long-Term Prevalence and Recovery Rate

Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo
;
Tofanelli, Margherita;Zanelli, Enrico;Tirelli, Giancarlo
2023-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: No studies have reported data on 2-year prevalence and recovery rates of self-reported COVID-19-related quantitative and qualitative olfactory and gustatory dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to estimate the 2-year prevalence and recovery rate of self-reported COVID-19-related olfactory and gustatory dysfunction in a cohort of patients with antecedent mild-to-moderate disease. Methods: This is a prospective observational study, measuring the prevalence of altered sense of smell or taste at follow-up and their variation from baseline, on adult patients consecutively assessed at Trieste University Hospital, who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by polymerase chain reaction during March 2020. Results: Overall, 174 (68.8%), 53 (20.9%), and 36 (14.2%) of 253 responders reported an altered sense of smell or taste (SNOT-22 >0) at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months, respectively. Among the 174 patients who have complained a COVID-19-associated olfactory or gustatory dysfunction at baseline, 138 (79.3%) reported complete resolution of smell or taste impairment with 17 subjects (9.8%) recovering after more than 1 year after the initial infection, 33 (19.0%) reported a decrease in the severity, and only 3 (1.7%) reported that the symptom was unchanged at the 24-month interview. Twenty subjects (7.9%) complained of at least one qualitative long-term symptom. Conclusion: Two years after the infection, most patients experience a favourable evolution of COVID-19-related olfactory or gustatory dysfunction. A late recovery was observed in 10% of subjects.
2023
5-set-2022
Pubblicato
ORL
https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/525861
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9747726/
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
document.pdf

Accesso chiuso

Descrizione: Liberamente accessibile dal sito dell'editore.
Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Copyright Editore
Dimensione 88.24 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
88.24 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Extra.pdf

Accesso chiuso

Descrizione: Materiale supplementare
Tipologia: Altro materiale allegato
Licenza: Copyright Editore
Dimensione 128.32 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
128.32 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3030379
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 3
  • Scopus 10
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 8
social impact