Background - Although cannabinoids consumption represents a current social and health problem, especially in a historical context characterized by an open orientation for recreational and therapeutic purposes, risks regarding neurotoxicity of such substances is a frequently overlooked issue. Objective - The present systematic review aims to summarize the available evidence regarding the mechanism of cannabinoids-induced brain damage as a substrate of neurological, psychiatric, and behavioral effects. Another objective is to provide support for future investigations and for legislative choices. Methods - The systematic literature search through PubMed and Scopus and a critical appraisal of the collected studies were conducted. Search terms were "(("Cannabinoids" OR "THC" OR "CBD") AND "Brain" AND ("Damage" OR "Toxicity"))" in title and abstracts. Studies examining toxic effects on the brain potentially induced by cannabinoids on human subjects were included. Results - At the end of the literature selection process, 30 papers were considered for the present review. The consumption of cannabinoids is associated with the development of psychiatric, neurocognitive, neurological disorders and, in some cases of acute consumption, even death. In this sense, the greatest risks have been related to the consumption of high-potency synthetic cannabinoids, although the consumption of phytocannabinoids is not devoid of risks. Conclusion - The research carried out has allowed to highlight some critical points to focus on, such as the need to reinforce the toxic-epidemiologic monitor of new substances market and the importance of information for both medical personnel and general population, with particular attention to the mostly involved age groups.

Cannabinoids and brain damage: A systematic review on a frequently overlooked issue

'Errico, Stefano D;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background - Although cannabinoids consumption represents a current social and health problem, especially in a historical context characterized by an open orientation for recreational and therapeutic purposes, risks regarding neurotoxicity of such substances is a frequently overlooked issue. Objective - The present systematic review aims to summarize the available evidence regarding the mechanism of cannabinoids-induced brain damage as a substrate of neurological, psychiatric, and behavioral effects. Another objective is to provide support for future investigations and for legislative choices. Methods - The systematic literature search through PubMed and Scopus and a critical appraisal of the collected studies were conducted. Search terms were "(("Cannabinoids" OR "THC" OR "CBD") AND "Brain" AND ("Damage" OR "Toxicity"))" in title and abstracts. Studies examining toxic effects on the brain potentially induced by cannabinoids on human subjects were included. Results - At the end of the literature selection process, 30 papers were considered for the present review. The consumption of cannabinoids is associated with the development of psychiatric, neurocognitive, neurological disorders and, in some cases of acute consumption, even death. In this sense, the greatest risks have been related to the consumption of high-potency synthetic cannabinoids, although the consumption of phytocannabinoids is not devoid of risks. Conclusion - The research carried out has allowed to highlight some critical points to focus on, such as the need to reinforce the toxic-epidemiologic monitor of new substances market and the importance of information for both medical personnel and general population, with particular attention to the mostly involved age groups.
2023
2-set-2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3030419
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