wide range of sensors and electronic devices. The relevance of molecular recognition and the binding of biological and chemical entities to diagnostics, biosensors, and drug delivery has attracted significant research interest. By addressing material functionalization design and advanced characterization methods, this doctoral work aims to highlight efforts to exploit the surface modification strategies to enhance the responsiveness of nanoparticle substrates for improved detection of health-relevant biomolecules. The self-assembly of small ligands, such as alkanethiols and oligonucleotides on the surface of AuNPs provided a possible starting route for the preparation of bio-nanomaterials with precise physicochemical properties. The versatile AuNPs were optimized and thoroughly characterized by employing electron microscopy techniques such as transmission electron microscope (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), spectroscopic techniques, including ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and thermal lens spectrometry (TLS), and biochemical assays (gel electrophoresis, Dot plot, Western plot, and the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)). Subsequently, the molecular recognition capabilities of functionalized AuNPs were investigated using multiple techniques, including novel detection routes such as the electrophoresis approach coupled with online TLS. This work establishes a versatile platform for AuNP engineering with controlled size and surface functionality. The strategies presented in this thesis aim to improve medical diagnostics to make them affordable for point-of-care scenarios to enhance the quality of human health.

Metallic plasmonic substrates such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have fascinated researchers due to their usefulness in verious interdisciplinary studies at the interface between applied physics, biochemistry, engineering, and medicine. A good understanding of the physics of these noble nanostructures, particularly the plasmonic and optical properties, can be employed to improve a wide range of sensors and electronic devices. The relevance of molecular recognition and the binding of biological and chemical entities to diagnostics, biosensors, and drug delivery has attracted significant research interest. By addressing material functionalization design and advanced characterization methods, this doctoral work aims to highlight efforts to exploit the surface modification strategies to enhance the responsiveness of nanoparticle substrates for improved detection of health-relevant biomolecules. The self-assembly of small ligands, such as alkanethiols, and oligonucleotides on the surface of AuNPs provided a possible starting route for the preparation of bio-nanomaterials with precise physicochemical properties. The versatile AuNPs were optimized and thoroughly characterized by employing electron microscopy techniques such as transmission electron microscope (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), spectroscopic techniques, including ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and thermal lens spectrometry (TLS), and biochemical assays (gel electrophoresis, Dot plot, Western plot, and the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)). Subsequently, the molecular recognition capabilities of functionalized AuNPs were investigated using multiple techniques, including novel detection routes such as the electrophoresis approach coupled with online TLS. This work establishes a versatile platform for AuNP engineering with controlled size and surface functionality. The strategies presented in this thesis aim to improve medical diagnostics to make them affordable for point-of-care scenarios to enhance the quality of human health.

Harnessing the plasmonic properties of gold nanoparticles: functionalization strategies coupled with novel spectroscopic tools

MOHAMMED, AHMED ALSADIG AHMED
2022

Abstract

Metallic plasmonic substrates such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have fascinated researchers due to their usefulness in verious interdisciplinary studies at the interface between applied physics, biochemistry, engineering, and medicine. A good understanding of the physics of these noble nanostructures, particularly the plasmonic and optical properties, can be employed to improve a wide range of sensors and electronic devices. The relevance of molecular recognition and the binding of biological and chemical entities to diagnostics, biosensors, and drug delivery has attracted significant research interest. By addressing material functionalization design and advanced characterization methods, this doctoral work aims to highlight efforts to exploit the surface modification strategies to enhance the responsiveness of nanoparticle substrates for improved detection of health-relevant biomolecules. The self-assembly of small ligands, such as alkanethiols, and oligonucleotides on the surface of AuNPs provided a possible starting route for the preparation of bio-nanomaterials with precise physicochemical properties. The versatile AuNPs were optimized and thoroughly characterized by employing electron microscopy techniques such as transmission electron microscope (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), spectroscopic techniques, including ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and thermal lens spectrometry (TLS), and biochemical assays (gel electrophoresis, Dot plot, Western plot, and the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)). Subsequently, the molecular recognition capabilities of functionalized AuNPs were investigated using multiple techniques, including novel detection routes such as the electrophoresis approach coupled with online TLS. This work establishes a versatile platform for AuNP engineering with controlled size and surface functionality. The strategies presented in this thesis aim to improve medical diagnostics to make them affordable for point-of-care scenarios to enhance the quality of human health.
34
2020/2021
Settore FIS/03 - Fisica della Materia
Università degli Studi di Trieste
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3030486
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