Motion triggered camera traps are an increasingly popular tool for wildlife research and can be used to survey for multiple species simultaneously. As with all survey techniques, it is crucial to conduct camera trapping research following study designs that include adequate spatial and temporal replication, and sufficient probability of detecting species presence. The use and configuration of multiple camera traps within a single survey site are understudied considerations that could have a substantial impact on detection probability. Our objective was to test the role that camera number (one, two or three units), and spacing along a linear transect (100 m or 150 m), have on the probability of detecting a species given it is present. From January to March, 2017 we collected data on six mammal species in Maine, USA: coyote (Canis latrans), fisher (Pekania pennanti), American marten (Martes americana), short-tailed weasel (Mustela erminea), snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), and American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). We used multi-scale occupancy modelling to compare pooled detection histories of different configuration of five cameras deployed at the same survey site (n = 32), and how the configuration would influence the probability of detecting a species given it was available at the site. Across all six species, we found substantial increases in probability of detection as the number of cameras increased from one to two (22 to 400 percent increase), regardless of the spacing between cameras. For most species the magnitude of the increase was less substantial when adding a third camera (4 to 85 percent increase), with coyote and snowshoe hare showing a pronounced effect. The influence of survey station features also varied by species. We suggest that using pooled data from two or three cameras at a survey site is a cost effective approach to increase detection success over a single camera.

Assessing linear arrays with multiple trail cameras to detect North American mammals

Mortelliti A
2019-01-01

Abstract

Motion triggered camera traps are an increasingly popular tool for wildlife research and can be used to survey for multiple species simultaneously. As with all survey techniques, it is crucial to conduct camera trapping research following study designs that include adequate spatial and temporal replication, and sufficient probability of detecting species presence. The use and configuration of multiple camera traps within a single survey site are understudied considerations that could have a substantial impact on detection probability. Our objective was to test the role that camera number (one, two or three units), and spacing along a linear transect (100 m or 150 m), have on the probability of detecting a species given it is present. From January to March, 2017 we collected data on six mammal species in Maine, USA: coyote (Canis latrans), fisher (Pekania pennanti), American marten (Martes americana), short-tailed weasel (Mustela erminea), snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), and American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). We used multi-scale occupancy modelling to compare pooled detection histories of different configuration of five cameras deployed at the same survey site (n = 32), and how the configuration would influence the probability of detecting a species given it was available at the site. Across all six species, we found substantial increases in probability of detection as the number of cameras increased from one to two (22 to 400 percent increase), regardless of the spacing between cameras. For most species the magnitude of the increase was less substantial when adding a third camera (4 to 85 percent increase), with coyote and snowshoe hare showing a pronounced effect. The influence of survey station features also varied by species. We suggest that using pooled data from two or three cameras at a survey site is a cost effective approach to increase detection success over a single camera.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3033851
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