Background: Enteral nutrition is often prescribed in acute stroke to meet energy and fluid needs in patients with dysphagia. Tubes clogging represent a common complication of enteral formula delivery, requiring substitution and influencing nutrition administration. Frequent water flushes are recommended as one of the most effective procedures to prevent tube occlusion, but it might be time demanding and not consistently performed by the healthcare staff. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of an automatic flush pump, compared to a manual flush system, to prevent tubes' occlusions in acute-stroke patients, as this might affect nutrition and hydration. Methods: Gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrition and hydration biomarkers were also monitored to determine the different devices' safety. Sixty-two patients were included in the study and allocated to the "manual" or "automatic" flushes device. Results: The mean duration of data collection was 7 +/- 2 days. Tube occlusions occurred in 22.6% of the patients in the "manual" group, whereas only one tube clogging was reported in the "automatic" group (p = 0.023). No significant differences between groups were reported for constipation and diarrhea frequency nor nutrition and hydration status. When the nurses were asked to simulate manual flush administration at the same frequency of the automatic device, they were able to meet the recommendations only 10% of the time. Conclusion: This preliminary study suggests the efficacy of automatic flush systems to prevent enteral tube clogging, without affecting health status compared to standard manual flush systems.

Enteral Nutrition and Hydration in Patients with Acute Stroke: Efficacy of an Automatic Pump System for Water Administration and Flushes-A Pilot Study

Buoite Stella A.
;
Manganotti P.
2022

Abstract

Background: Enteral nutrition is often prescribed in acute stroke to meet energy and fluid needs in patients with dysphagia. Tubes clogging represent a common complication of enteral formula delivery, requiring substitution and influencing nutrition administration. Frequent water flushes are recommended as one of the most effective procedures to prevent tube occlusion, but it might be time demanding and not consistently performed by the healthcare staff. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of an automatic flush pump, compared to a manual flush system, to prevent tubes' occlusions in acute-stroke patients, as this might affect nutrition and hydration. Methods: Gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrition and hydration biomarkers were also monitored to determine the different devices' safety. Sixty-two patients were included in the study and allocated to the "manual" or "automatic" flushes device. Results: The mean duration of data collection was 7 +/- 2 days. Tube occlusions occurred in 22.6% of the patients in the "manual" group, whereas only one tube clogging was reported in the "automatic" group (p = 0.023). No significant differences between groups were reported for constipation and diarrhea frequency nor nutrition and hydration status. When the nurses were asked to simulate manual flush administration at the same frequency of the automatic device, they were able to meet the recommendations only 10% of the time. Conclusion: This preliminary study suggests the efficacy of automatic flush systems to prevent enteral tube clogging, without affecting health status compared to standard manual flush systems.
Pubblicato
https://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/22/20/8029
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9609995/
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3034075
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