: Ocular following eye movements have provided insights into how the visual system of humans and monkeys processes motion. Recently, it has been shown that they also reliably reveal stereoanomalies, and, thus, might have clinical applications. Their translation from research to clinical setting has however been hindered by their small size, which makes them difficult to record, and by a lack of data about their properties in sizable populations. Notably, they have so far only been recorded in adults. We recorded ocular following responses (OFRs)-defined as the change in eye position in the 80-160 ms time window following the motion onset of a large textured stimulus-in 14 school-age children (6 to 13 years old, 9 males and 5 females), under recording conditions that closely mimic a clinical setting. The OFRs were acquired non-invasively by a custom developed high-resolution video-oculography system, described in this study. With the developed system we were able to non-invasively detect OFRs in all children in short recording sessions. Across subjects, we observed a large variability in the magnitude of the movements (by a factor of 4); OFR magnitude was however not correlated with age. A power analysis indicates that even considerably smaller movements could be detected. We conclude that the ocular following system is well developed by age six, and OFRs can be recorded non-invasively in young children in a clinical setting.

Ocular-following responses in school-age children

Miladinović, Aleksandar;Ajčević, Miloš;Accardo, Agostino
2022-01-01

Abstract

: Ocular following eye movements have provided insights into how the visual system of humans and monkeys processes motion. Recently, it has been shown that they also reliably reveal stereoanomalies, and, thus, might have clinical applications. Their translation from research to clinical setting has however been hindered by their small size, which makes them difficult to record, and by a lack of data about their properties in sizable populations. Notably, they have so far only been recorded in adults. We recorded ocular following responses (OFRs)-defined as the change in eye position in the 80-160 ms time window following the motion onset of a large textured stimulus-in 14 school-age children (6 to 13 years old, 9 males and 5 females), under recording conditions that closely mimic a clinical setting. The OFRs were acquired non-invasively by a custom developed high-resolution video-oculography system, described in this study. With the developed system we were able to non-invasively detect OFRs in all children in short recording sessions. Across subjects, we observed a large variability in the magnitude of the movements (by a factor of 4); OFR magnitude was however not correlated with age. A power analysis indicates that even considerably smaller movements could be detected. We conclude that the ocular following system is well developed by age six, and OFRs can be recorded non-invasively in young children in a clinical setting.
2022
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https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0277443
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3039458
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