The in utero microbiome hypothesis has been long debated. This hypothesis will change our comprehension of the pioneer human microbiome if proved correct. In 60 uncomplicated pregnancies, we profiled the microbiome of chorionic villi (CV) and amniotic fluids (AF) in relation to maternal saliva, rectum, and vagina and the soluble cytokines cascade in the vagina, CV and AF. In our series, 12/37 (32%) AF and 10/23 (44%) CV tested positive for bacterial DNA. CV and AF harbored bacterial DNA of Streptococcus and Lactobacillus, overlapping that of the matched oral and vaginal niches, which showed a dysbiotic microbiome. In these pregnant women, the immune profiling revealed an immune hyporesponsiveness in the vagina and a high intraamniotic concentration of inflammatory cytokines. To understand the eventual role of bacterial colonization of the CV and AF and the associated immune response in the pregnancy outcome, further appropriate studies are needed. In this context, further studies should highlight if the hematogenous route could justify the spread of bacterial DNA from the oral microbiome to the placenta and if vaginal dysbiosis could favor the likelihood of identifying CV and AF positive for bacterial DNA.

The Bacterial DNA Profiling of Chorionic Villi and Amniotic Fluids Reveals Overlaps with Maternal Oral, Vaginal, and Gut Microbiomes

Campisciano, Giuseppina
;
Zanotta, Nunzia;Quadrifoglio, Mariachiara;Careri, Annalisa;Torresani, Alessandra;Cason, Carolina;De Seta, Francesco;Ricci, Giuseppe;Comar, Manola;Stampalija, Tamara
2023-01-01

Abstract

The in utero microbiome hypothesis has been long debated. This hypothesis will change our comprehension of the pioneer human microbiome if proved correct. In 60 uncomplicated pregnancies, we profiled the microbiome of chorionic villi (CV) and amniotic fluids (AF) in relation to maternal saliva, rectum, and vagina and the soluble cytokines cascade in the vagina, CV and AF. In our series, 12/37 (32%) AF and 10/23 (44%) CV tested positive for bacterial DNA. CV and AF harbored bacterial DNA of Streptococcus and Lactobacillus, overlapping that of the matched oral and vaginal niches, which showed a dysbiotic microbiome. In these pregnant women, the immune profiling revealed an immune hyporesponsiveness in the vagina and a high intraamniotic concentration of inflammatory cytokines. To understand the eventual role of bacterial colonization of the CV and AF and the associated immune response in the pregnancy outcome, further appropriate studies are needed. In this context, further studies should highlight if the hematogenous route could justify the spread of bacterial DNA from the oral microbiome to the placenta and if vaginal dysbiosis could favor the likelihood of identifying CV and AF positive for bacterial DNA.
2023
Pubblicato
https://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/24/3/2873
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9917689/
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
ijms-24-02873.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 2.94 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.94 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
ijms-2134770-supplementary.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Supplementary materials
Tipologia: Altro materiale allegato
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 130.17 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
130.17 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3043841
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact