Genetics plays an important role in individual differences in food liking, which influences food choices and health. Sweet food liking is a complex trait and has been associated with increased body mass index (BMI) and related comorbidities. This genome-wide association study (GWAS) aimed to investigate the genetics of sweet food liking using two adult discovery cohorts (n = 1109, n = 373) and an independent replication cohort (n = 1073). In addition, we tested the association of our strongest result on parameters related to behaviour (food adventurousness (FA) and reward dependence (RD) and health status (BMI and blood glucose). The results demonstrate a novel strong association between the Regulator of G-Protein Signalling 9 (RGS9I) gene, strongest single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs58931966 (p-value 7.05 × 10−9 in the combined sample of discovery and replication), and sweet food liking, with the minor allele (A) being associated with a decreased sweet food liking. We also found that the A allele of the rs58931966 SNP was associated with decreased FA and RD, and increased BMI and blood glucose (p-values < 0.05). Differences were highlighted in sex-specific analysis on BMI and glucose. Our results highlight a novel genetic association with food liking and are indicative of genetic variation influencing the psychological–biological drivers of food preference. If confirmed in other studies, such genetic associations could allow a greater understanding of chronic disease management from both a habitual dietary intake and reward-related perspective.

Regulator of G-Protein Signalling 9: A New Candidate Gene for Sweet Food Liking?

Spedicati, Beatrice;Gasparini, Paolo;Concas, Maria Pina
2023-01-01

Abstract

Genetics plays an important role in individual differences in food liking, which influences food choices and health. Sweet food liking is a complex trait and has been associated with increased body mass index (BMI) and related comorbidities. This genome-wide association study (GWAS) aimed to investigate the genetics of sweet food liking using two adult discovery cohorts (n = 1109, n = 373) and an independent replication cohort (n = 1073). In addition, we tested the association of our strongest result on parameters related to behaviour (food adventurousness (FA) and reward dependence (RD) and health status (BMI and blood glucose). The results demonstrate a novel strong association between the Regulator of G-Protein Signalling 9 (RGS9I) gene, strongest single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs58931966 (p-value 7.05 × 10−9 in the combined sample of discovery and replication), and sweet food liking, with the minor allele (A) being associated with a decreased sweet food liking. We also found that the A allele of the rs58931966 SNP was associated with decreased FA and RD, and increased BMI and blood glucose (p-values < 0.05). Differences were highlighted in sex-specific analysis on BMI and glucose. Our results highlight a novel genetic association with food liking and are indicative of genetic variation influencing the psychological–biological drivers of food preference. If confirmed in other studies, such genetic associations could allow a greater understanding of chronic disease management from both a habitual dietary intake and reward-related perspective.
2023
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https://www.mdpi.com/2304-8158/12/9/1739
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3043846
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