Cancer cells within tumor masses are chronically exposed to stress caused by nutrient deprivation, oxygen limitation, and high metabolic demand. They also accumulate hundreds of mutations, potentially generating aberrant proteins that can induce proteotoxic stress. Finally, cancer cells are exposed to various damages during chemotherapy. In a growing tumor, transformed cells eventually adapt to these conditions, eluding the death-inducing outcomes of signaling cascades triggered by chronic stress. One such extreme outcome is ferroptosis, a form of iron-dependent non-apoptotic cell death mediated by lipid peroxidation. Not surprisingly, the tumor suppressor p53 is involved in this process, with evidence suggesting that it acts as a pro-ferroptotic factor and that its ferroptosis-inducing activity may be relevant for tumor suppression. Missense alterations of the TP53 gene are extremely frequent in human cancers and give rise to mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) that lose tumor suppressive function and can acquire powerful oncogenic activities. This suggests that p53 mutation provides a selective advantage during tumor progression, raising interesting questions on the impact of p53 mutant proteins in modulating the ferroptotic process. Here, we explore the role of p53 and its cancer-related mutants in ferroptosis, using a perspective centered on the resistance/sensitivity of cancer cells to exogenous and endogenous stress conditions that can trigger ferroptotic cell death. We speculate that an accurate molecular understanding of this particular axis may improve cancer treatment options.

Wild-type and mutant p53 in cancer-related ferroptosis. A matter of stress management?

Corazzari M.
;
Collavin L.
2023-01-01

Abstract

Cancer cells within tumor masses are chronically exposed to stress caused by nutrient deprivation, oxygen limitation, and high metabolic demand. They also accumulate hundreds of mutations, potentially generating aberrant proteins that can induce proteotoxic stress. Finally, cancer cells are exposed to various damages during chemotherapy. In a growing tumor, transformed cells eventually adapt to these conditions, eluding the death-inducing outcomes of signaling cascades triggered by chronic stress. One such extreme outcome is ferroptosis, a form of iron-dependent non-apoptotic cell death mediated by lipid peroxidation. Not surprisingly, the tumor suppressor p53 is involved in this process, with evidence suggesting that it acts as a pro-ferroptotic factor and that its ferroptosis-inducing activity may be relevant for tumor suppression. Missense alterations of the TP53 gene are extremely frequent in human cancers and give rise to mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) that lose tumor suppressive function and can acquire powerful oncogenic activities. This suggests that p53 mutation provides a selective advantage during tumor progression, raising interesting questions on the impact of p53 mutant proteins in modulating the ferroptotic process. Here, we explore the role of p53 and its cancer-related mutants in ferroptosis, using a perspective centered on the resistance/sensitivity of cancer cells to exogenous and endogenous stress conditions that can trigger ferroptotic cell death. We speculate that an accurate molecular understanding of this particular axis may improve cancer treatment options.
2023
Pubblicato
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fgene.2023.1148192/full
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2023 Corazzari e Collavin Fgen.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 1.32 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.32 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3044198
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact