High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) needs new technologies for improving cancer diagnosis and therapy. It is a fatal disease with few options for the patients. In this context, dynamic culture systems coupling with patient-derived cancer 3D microstructures could offer a new opportunity for exploring novel therapeutic approaches. In this study, we optimized a passive microfluidic platform with 3D cancer organoids, which allows a standardized approach among different patients, a minimum requirement of samples, multiple interrogations of biological events, and a rapid response. The passive flow was optimized to improve the growth of cancer organoids, avoiding the disruption of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Under optimized conditions of the OrganoFlow (tilting angle of 15° and an interval of rocking every 8 min), the cancer organoids grow faster than when they are in static conditions and the number of dead cells is reduced over time. To calculate the IC 50 values of standard chemotherapeutic drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin) and targeted drugs (ATRA), different approaches were utilized. Resazurin staining, ATP-based assay, and DAPI/PI colocalization assays were compared, and the IC 50 values were calculated. The results showed that in the passive flow, the IC 50 values are lower than in static conditions. FITC-labeled paclitaxel shows a better penetration of ECM under passive flow than in static conditions, and cancer organoids start to die after 48 h instead of 96 h, respectively. Cancer organoids are the last frontiers for ex vivo testing of drugs that replicate the response of patients in the clinic. For this study, organoids derived from ascites or tissues of patients with Ovarian Cancer have been used. In conclusion, it was possible to develop a protocol for organoid cultures in a passive microfluidic platform with a higher growth rate, faster drug response, and better penetration of drugs into ECM, maintaining the samples' vitals and collecting the data on the same plate for up to 16 drugs.

3D dynamic cultures of HGSOC organoids to model innovative and standard therapies

Canzonieri, Vincenzo;
2023-01-01

Abstract

High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) needs new technologies for improving cancer diagnosis and therapy. It is a fatal disease with few options for the patients. In this context, dynamic culture systems coupling with patient-derived cancer 3D microstructures could offer a new opportunity for exploring novel therapeutic approaches. In this study, we optimized a passive microfluidic platform with 3D cancer organoids, which allows a standardized approach among different patients, a minimum requirement of samples, multiple interrogations of biological events, and a rapid response. The passive flow was optimized to improve the growth of cancer organoids, avoiding the disruption of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Under optimized conditions of the OrganoFlow (tilting angle of 15° and an interval of rocking every 8 min), the cancer organoids grow faster than when they are in static conditions and the number of dead cells is reduced over time. To calculate the IC 50 values of standard chemotherapeutic drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin) and targeted drugs (ATRA), different approaches were utilized. Resazurin staining, ATP-based assay, and DAPI/PI colocalization assays were compared, and the IC 50 values were calculated. The results showed that in the passive flow, the IC 50 values are lower than in static conditions. FITC-labeled paclitaxel shows a better penetration of ECM under passive flow than in static conditions, and cancer organoids start to die after 48 h instead of 96 h, respectively. Cancer organoids are the last frontiers for ex vivo testing of drugs that replicate the response of patients in the clinic. For this study, organoids derived from ascites or tissues of patients with Ovarian Cancer have been used. In conclusion, it was possible to develop a protocol for organoid cultures in a passive microfluidic platform with a higher growth rate, faster drug response, and better penetration of drugs into ECM, maintaining the samples' vitals and collecting the data on the same plate for up to 16 drugs.
2023
Pubblicato
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fbioe.2023.1135374/full
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC10151532/
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
fbioe-11-1135374.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: articolo
Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 4.3 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
4.3 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Data Sheet 1.PDF

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Supplementary material
Tipologia: Altro materiale allegato
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 1.95 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.95 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3046778
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 4
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact