To date, the effects of specific modification types and sites on protein lifetime have not been systematically illustrated. Here, we describe a proteomic method, DeltaSILAC, to quantitatively assess the impact of site-specific phosphorylation on the turnover of thousands of proteins in live cells. Based on the accurate and reproducible mass spectrometry-based method, a pulse labeling approach using stable isotope-labeled amino acids in cells (pSILAC), phosphoproteomics, and a unique peptide-level matching strategy, our DeltaSILAC profiling revealed a global, unexpected delaying effect of many phosphosites on protein turnover. We further found that phosphorylated sites accelerating protein turnover are functionally selected for cell fitness, enriched in Cyclin-dependent kinase substrates, and evolutionarily conserved, whereas the glutamic acids surrounding phosphosites significantly delay protein turnover. Our method represents a generalizable approach and provides a rich resource for prioritizing the effects of phosphorylation sites on protein lifetime in the context of cell signaling and disease biology.

Global and Site-Specific Effect of Phosphorylation on Protein Turnover

Fornasiero, Eugenio
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2020-01-01

Abstract

To date, the effects of specific modification types and sites on protein lifetime have not been systematically illustrated. Here, we describe a proteomic method, DeltaSILAC, to quantitatively assess the impact of site-specific phosphorylation on the turnover of thousands of proteins in live cells. Based on the accurate and reproducible mass spectrometry-based method, a pulse labeling approach using stable isotope-labeled amino acids in cells (pSILAC), phosphoproteomics, and a unique peptide-level matching strategy, our DeltaSILAC profiling revealed a global, unexpected delaying effect of many phosphosites on protein turnover. We further found that phosphorylated sites accelerating protein turnover are functionally selected for cell fitness, enriched in Cyclin-dependent kinase substrates, and evolutionarily conserved, whereas the glutamic acids surrounding phosphosites significantly delay protein turnover. Our method represents a generalizable approach and provides a rich resource for prioritizing the effects of phosphorylation sites on protein lifetime in the context of cell signaling and disease biology.
2020
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https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1534580720308753?via=ihub
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3046840
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