A lack of aggregate analysis concerning energy communities exists in the academic literature. The authors utilized a combination of literature reviews and desk research to fill this gap. The existing debate on the classification of energy communities was summarized and aligned. Discovered classifications were used to analyze the status quo of the sector. The authors found nearly 4000 energy communities with 900,000 members in the European Union. On average, there are 844 members per one energy community. Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark, and the United Kingdom are at the forefront of the movement. Different countries have different primary sources of renewable energy utilized by energy communities, and membership structures vary based on the energy source and corporate purpose of the energy community together with the sector's maturity in a certain country. Predominantly, hydro and biomass are used by energy communities in Alpine countries, solar energy is used in Germany, Spain, and France, wind in the Netherlands and Denmark, and different renewables in the United Kingdom. More members have joined the hydro, biomass, and wind communities than solar communities. Each country has national and regional associations of energy communities. In addition, intermediary actors, researchers, and consultancy agencies have shown a growing interest in the deployment of the movement. Achieving a conformity of business models Europe-wide would probably be impossible and pointless. Distinct geographical, institutional, and policy context-specific conditions stimulate diversity rather than conformity.

Mapping of Energy Communities in Europe: Status Quo and Review of Existing Classifications

Maksym Koltunov;
2023-01-01

Abstract

A lack of aggregate analysis concerning energy communities exists in the academic literature. The authors utilized a combination of literature reviews and desk research to fill this gap. The existing debate on the classification of energy communities was summarized and aligned. Discovered classifications were used to analyze the status quo of the sector. The authors found nearly 4000 energy communities with 900,000 members in the European Union. On average, there are 844 members per one energy community. Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark, and the United Kingdom are at the forefront of the movement. Different countries have different primary sources of renewable energy utilized by energy communities, and membership structures vary based on the energy source and corporate purpose of the energy community together with the sector's maturity in a certain country. Predominantly, hydro and biomass are used by energy communities in Alpine countries, solar energy is used in Germany, Spain, and France, wind in the Netherlands and Denmark, and different renewables in the United Kingdom. More members have joined the hydro, biomass, and wind communities than solar communities. Each country has national and regional associations of energy communities. In addition, intermediary actors, researchers, and consultancy agencies have shown a growing interest in the deployment of the movement. Achieving a conformity of business models Europe-wide would probably be impossible and pointless. Distinct geographical, institutional, and policy context-specific conditions stimulate diversity rather than conformity.
2023
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https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/15/10/8201
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3049558
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