A few scattered vessels, typologically attributed to the Gáta-Wieselburg culture, are known from the Friuli Venezia Giulia region in north-eastern Italy. This culture spread during the Early Bronze Age (Reinecke Br A1b and A2, 2100–1700/1600 BC) in present-day eastern Austria, western Hungary and south-western Slovakia. Rare artefacts, typically biconical double-handled jugs with well-burnished surfaces, have been discovered in caves of the Trieste Karst (Ciclami, Tartaruga, Teresiana, and Ossa) and the Natisone Valley (Velika jama). This study aims to outline the technology, provenance, and probable use of these rare jugs from the Trieste Karst. Two of these vessels from the Ciclami and Tartaruga caves have been investigated using various destructive and non-destructive techniques, including optical microscopy, X-ray computed micro-tomography, and prompt-gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and chemically compared to contemporaneous vessels from the core region of the Gáta-Wieselburg culture in Hungary (10 vessels specifically analysed for this roject and earlier Neolithic and Copper Age vessels, likely produced locally in the Karst, Slovenia, and Hungary. Based on the obtained results, the investigated Karst vessels were imported. Tentative identification of plant and animal lipids using organic residue analysis (i.e. gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) sheds light on their possible function.

Provenance, technology and possible function of Gáta-Wieselburg vessels from the Trieste Karst (north-eastern Italy)

Bernardini Federico
;
De Min Angelo;Velicogna Matteo;
2024-01-01

Abstract

A few scattered vessels, typologically attributed to the Gáta-Wieselburg culture, are known from the Friuli Venezia Giulia region in north-eastern Italy. This culture spread during the Early Bronze Age (Reinecke Br A1b and A2, 2100–1700/1600 BC) in present-day eastern Austria, western Hungary and south-western Slovakia. Rare artefacts, typically biconical double-handled jugs with well-burnished surfaces, have been discovered in caves of the Trieste Karst (Ciclami, Tartaruga, Teresiana, and Ossa) and the Natisone Valley (Velika jama). This study aims to outline the technology, provenance, and probable use of these rare jugs from the Trieste Karst. Two of these vessels from the Ciclami and Tartaruga caves have been investigated using various destructive and non-destructive techniques, including optical microscopy, X-ray computed micro-tomography, and prompt-gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and chemically compared to contemporaneous vessels from the core region of the Gáta-Wieselburg culture in Hungary (10 vessels specifically analysed for this roject and earlier Neolithic and Copper Age vessels, likely produced locally in the Karst, Slovenia, and Hungary. Based on the obtained results, the investigated Karst vessels were imported. Tentative identification of plant and animal lipids using organic residue analysis (i.e. gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) sheds light on their possible function.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3067760
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