Phosphodiesterase 2 A (PDE2A) is an enzyme involved in the homeostasis of cAMP and cGMP and is the most highly expressed PDE in human brain regions critical for socio-cognitive behavior. In cerebral cortex and hippocampus, PDE2A expression level is upregulated in Fmr1-KO mice, a model of the Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Indeed, PDE2A translation is negatively modulated by FMRP, whose functional absence causes FXS. While the pharmacological inhibition of PDE2A has been associated to its pro-cognitive role in normal animals and in models of ID and ASD, homozygous PDE2A mutations have been identified in patients affected by ID, ASD and epilepsy. To clarify this apparent paradox about the role of PDE2A in brain development, we characterized here Pde2a+/− mice (homozygote animals being not viable) at the behavioral, cellular, molecular and electrophysiological levels. Pde2a+/− females display a milder form of the disorder with reduced cognitive performance in adulthood, conversely males show severe socio-cognitive deficits throughout their life. In males, these phenotypes are associated with microglia activation, elevated glutathione levels and increased externalization of Glutamate receptor (GluR1) in CA1, producing reduced mGluR-dependent Long-term Depression. Overall, our results reveal molecular targets of the PDE2A-dependent pathway underlying socio-cognitive performance. These results clarify the mechanism of action of pro-cognitive drugs based on PDE2A inactivation, which have been shown to be promising therapeutic approaches for Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, FXS as well as other forms of ASD.

Defects in AMPAR trafficking and microglia activation underlie socio-cognitive deficits associated to decreased expression of Phosphodiesterase 2A

Gabriele Baj;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Phosphodiesterase 2 A (PDE2A) is an enzyme involved in the homeostasis of cAMP and cGMP and is the most highly expressed PDE in human brain regions critical for socio-cognitive behavior. In cerebral cortex and hippocampus, PDE2A expression level is upregulated in Fmr1-KO mice, a model of the Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Indeed, PDE2A translation is negatively modulated by FMRP, whose functional absence causes FXS. While the pharmacological inhibition of PDE2A has been associated to its pro-cognitive role in normal animals and in models of ID and ASD, homozygous PDE2A mutations have been identified in patients affected by ID, ASD and epilepsy. To clarify this apparent paradox about the role of PDE2A in brain development, we characterized here Pde2a+/− mice (homozygote animals being not viable) at the behavioral, cellular, molecular and electrophysiological levels. Pde2a+/− females display a milder form of the disorder with reduced cognitive performance in adulthood, conversely males show severe socio-cognitive deficits throughout their life. In males, these phenotypes are associated with microglia activation, elevated glutathione levels and increased externalization of Glutamate receptor (GluR1) in CA1, producing reduced mGluR-dependent Long-term Depression. Overall, our results reveal molecular targets of the PDE2A-dependent pathway underlying socio-cognitive performance. These results clarify the mechanism of action of pro-cognitive drugs based on PDE2A inactivation, which have been shown to be promising therapeutic approaches for Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, FXS as well as other forms of ASD.
2024
26-dic-2023
Pubblicato
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969996123004096
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
1-s2.0-S0969996123004096-main.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 5.18 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
5.18 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3067838
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact