Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem since it is one of the major sources of death and disability worldwide. TBI patients usually show high heterogeneity in their clinical features, including both cognitive and emotional/behavioral alterations. As it specifically concerns cognitive functioning, these patients usually show decision-making (DM) deficits. DM is commonly considered a complex and multistep process that is strictly linked to both hot and cold executive functioning and is pivotal for daily life functioning and patients’ autonomy. However, the results are not always in agreement, with some studies that report huge alterations in the DM processes, while others do not. The present systematic review and meta-analysis aims to integrate past literature on this topic, providing a clear and handy picture both for researchers and clinicians. Thirteen studies addressing domain-general DM abilities were included from an initial N = 968 (from three databases). Results showed low heterogeneity between the studies (I2 = 7.90, Q (12) = 13.03, p = .37) supporting the fact that, overall, TBI patients showed lower performance in DM tasks as compared to healthy controls (k = 899, g = .48, 95% CI [0.33; 0.62]) both in tasks under ambiguity and under risk. The evidence that emerged from this meta-analysis denotes a clear deficit of DM abilities in TBI patients. However, DM tasks seemed to have good sensitivity but low specificity. A detailed description of patients’ performances and the role of both bottom-up, hot executive functions and top-down control functions have been further discussed. Finally, future directions and practical implications for both researchers and clinicians have been put forward.

Decision-making abilities under risk and ambiguity in adults with traumatic brain injury: what do we know so far? A systematic review and meta-analysis

Cecilia Segatta;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem since it is one of the major sources of death and disability worldwide. TBI patients usually show high heterogeneity in their clinical features, including both cognitive and emotional/behavioral alterations. As it specifically concerns cognitive functioning, these patients usually show decision-making (DM) deficits. DM is commonly considered a complex and multistep process that is strictly linked to both hot and cold executive functioning and is pivotal for daily life functioning and patients’ autonomy. However, the results are not always in agreement, with some studies that report huge alterations in the DM processes, while others do not. The present systematic review and meta-analysis aims to integrate past literature on this topic, providing a clear and handy picture both for researchers and clinicians. Thirteen studies addressing domain-general DM abilities were included from an initial N = 968 (from three databases). Results showed low heterogeneity between the studies (I2 = 7.90, Q (12) = 13.03, p = .37) supporting the fact that, overall, TBI patients showed lower performance in DM tasks as compared to healthy controls (k = 899, g = .48, 95% CI [0.33; 0.62]) both in tasks under ambiguity and under risk. The evidence that emerged from this meta-analysis denotes a clear deficit of DM abilities in TBI patients. However, DM tasks seemed to have good sensitivity but low specificity. A detailed description of patients’ performances and the role of both bottom-up, hot executive functions and top-down control functions have been further discussed. Finally, future directions and practical implications for both researchers and clinicians have been put forward.
2023
10-ago-2023
Pubblicato
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13803395.2023.2245107
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3068622
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