Wood surface charring is a treatment method commonly employed to enhance weather protection and aesthetic appearance of building exteriors. This study aims to investigate the differences between two wood surface charring processes: the traditional Japanese method known as Yakisugi and an alternative charring technique industrially manufactured with a gas burner. The objective of the study was to assess whether a thicker layer after Yakisugi treatment has any advantages over a thinner layer after the alternative process. Vibrational spectroscopy techniques including UV resonance Raman (UVRR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, were utilized in conjunction with X-ray-micro-CT analysis. The findings revealed that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy detected the degradation of carbohydrates and changes in lignin within the charred surface, although both processes exhibited similar vibrational contributions. In contrast, UVRR spectroscopy provided insights into the carbonized layers, revealing spectral differences indicating variations in temperature during the charring processes. X-ray micro-CT analysis visually highlighted significant differences in the coal layers, suggesting distinct combustion profiles. Remarkably, the macrostructure of wood treated with Yakisugi remained intact despite a thicker charred layer compared to the alternative charring techniques. However, further investigations are required to assess the weather stability of the alternative charring method for a comprehensive understanding.

Comparative investigation of chemical and structural properties of charred fir wood samples by Raman and FTIR spectroscopy as well as X-ray-micro-CT technology

Giulia Saccomano
Investigation
;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Wood surface charring is a treatment method commonly employed to enhance weather protection and aesthetic appearance of building exteriors. This study aims to investigate the differences between two wood surface charring processes: the traditional Japanese method known as Yakisugi and an alternative charring technique industrially manufactured with a gas burner. The objective of the study was to assess whether a thicker layer after Yakisugi treatment has any advantages over a thinner layer after the alternative process. Vibrational spectroscopy techniques including UV resonance Raman (UVRR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, were utilized in conjunction with X-ray-micro-CT analysis. The findings revealed that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy detected the degradation of carbohydrates and changes in lignin within the charred surface, although both processes exhibited similar vibrational contributions. In contrast, UVRR spectroscopy provided insights into the carbonized layers, revealing spectral differences indicating variations in temperature during the charring processes. X-ray micro-CT analysis visually highlighted significant differences in the coal layers, suggesting distinct combustion profiles. Remarkably, the macrostructure of wood treated with Yakisugi remained intact despite a thicker charred layer compared to the alternative charring techniques. However, further investigations are required to assess the weather stability of the alternative charring method for a comprehensive understanding.
2023
Pubblicato
https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/hf-2023-0024/html
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3068678
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