Although cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) includes lifesaving maneuvers, it might be associated with a wide spectrum of iatrogenic injuries. Among these, acute lung injury (ALI) is frequent and yields significant challenges to post-cardiac arrest recovery. Understanding the relationship between CPR and ALI is determinant for refining resuscitation techniques and improving patient outcomes. This review aims to analyze the existing literature on ALI following CPR, emphasizing prevalence, clinical implications, and contributing factors. The review seeks to elucidate the pathogenesis of ALI in the context of CPR, assess the efficacy of CPR techniques and ventilation strategies, and explore their impact on post-cardiac arrest outcomes. CPR-related injuries, ranging from skeletal fractures to severe internal organ damage, underscore the complexity of managing post-cardiac arrest patients. Chest compression, particularly when prolonged and vigorous, i.e., mechanical compression, appears to be a crucial factor contributing to ALI, with the concept of cardiopulmonary resuscitation-associated lung edema (CRALE) gaining prominence. Ventilation strategies during CPR and post-cardiac arrest syndrome also play pivotal roles in ALI development. The recognition of CPR-related lung injuries, especially CRALE and ALI, highlights the need for research on optimizing CPR techniques and tailoring ventilation strategies during and after resuscitation.

Acute Lung Injury after Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Narrative Review

Francesca Fumagalli;Erik Roman-Pognuz
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Giuseppe Ristagno
2024-01-01

Abstract

Although cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) includes lifesaving maneuvers, it might be associated with a wide spectrum of iatrogenic injuries. Among these, acute lung injury (ALI) is frequent and yields significant challenges to post-cardiac arrest recovery. Understanding the relationship between CPR and ALI is determinant for refining resuscitation techniques and improving patient outcomes. This review aims to analyze the existing literature on ALI following CPR, emphasizing prevalence, clinical implications, and contributing factors. The review seeks to elucidate the pathogenesis of ALI in the context of CPR, assess the efficacy of CPR techniques and ventilation strategies, and explore their impact on post-cardiac arrest outcomes. CPR-related injuries, ranging from skeletal fractures to severe internal organ damage, underscore the complexity of managing post-cardiac arrest patients. Chest compression, particularly when prolonged and vigorous, i.e., mechanical compression, appears to be a crucial factor contributing to ALI, with the concept of cardiopulmonary resuscitation-associated lung edema (CRALE) gaining prominence. Ventilation strategies during CPR and post-cardiac arrest syndrome also play pivotal roles in ALI development. The recognition of CPR-related lung injuries, especially CRALE and ALI, highlights the need for research on optimizing CPR techniques and tailoring ventilation strategies during and after resuscitation.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
acute lung injury 2024.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 1.72 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.72 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3073758
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact