Objective: This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the efficacy of exercise in reducing OCD symptoms. Methods: We searched PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Scopus and grey literature until March 2022. The study was preregistered at Prospero (CRD42021283931). We included randomised controlled and pre-post trials assessing physical activity as an intervention for OCD. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane ROBINS-I tool and the RoB2 tool. Results: The analysis included 6 trials (N = 92); 2 were RCTS and 4 were pre-post design studies. A random-effects meta-analysis of pre-post data identified a large reduction of OCD symptoms following exercise (g = 1.33 [95%CI 1.06–1.61]; k = 6). Exercise was also associated with significant pre-post reductions in anxiety (g = 0.71 [95%CI 0.37–1.05; k = 4) and depression (g = 0.57 [95%CI 0.26–0.89]; k = 2). Risk of bias was moderate-high in uncontrolled trials on the ROBINS-I and RCTs showed ‘some concerns’ on the RoB2. Conclusion: Exercise was associated with a large pre-post reduction of OCD symptoms; however, few trials were of robust quality and all were at risk of bias. Further well-powered and better quality RCTs are required to assess the role of exercise as an intervention for OCD.KEY POINTS Studies exploring exercise as an adjunct therapy for OCD have small participant numbers, therefore a systematic review and meta-analysis is needed to estimate potential efficacy. Pre-post analysis shows that exercise was associated with a large reduction of OCD symptoms The current systematic review and meta-analysis points to the potential for exercise to be beneficial for the treatment for OCD symptoms. However, more well-powered and better controlled RCTs are required to fully assess the benefit of exercise for the treatment of OCD symptoms.

Effects of exercise on obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Pellegrini L.;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Objective: This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the efficacy of exercise in reducing OCD symptoms. Methods: We searched PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Scopus and grey literature until March 2022. The study was preregistered at Prospero (CRD42021283931). We included randomised controlled and pre-post trials assessing physical activity as an intervention for OCD. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane ROBINS-I tool and the RoB2 tool. Results: The analysis included 6 trials (N = 92); 2 were RCTS and 4 were pre-post design studies. A random-effects meta-analysis of pre-post data identified a large reduction of OCD symptoms following exercise (g = 1.33 [95%CI 1.06–1.61]; k = 6). Exercise was also associated with significant pre-post reductions in anxiety (g = 0.71 [95%CI 0.37–1.05; k = 4) and depression (g = 0.57 [95%CI 0.26–0.89]; k = 2). Risk of bias was moderate-high in uncontrolled trials on the ROBINS-I and RCTs showed ‘some concerns’ on the RoB2. Conclusion: Exercise was associated with a large pre-post reduction of OCD symptoms; however, few trials were of robust quality and all were at risk of bias. Further well-powered and better quality RCTs are required to assess the role of exercise as an intervention for OCD.KEY POINTS Studies exploring exercise as an adjunct therapy for OCD have small participant numbers, therefore a systematic review and meta-analysis is needed to estimate potential efficacy. Pre-post analysis shows that exercise was associated with a large reduction of OCD symptoms The current systematic review and meta-analysis points to the potential for exercise to be beneficial for the treatment for OCD symptoms. However, more well-powered and better controlled RCTs are required to fully assess the benefit of exercise for the treatment of OCD symptoms.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3075224
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