One of the main targets in current clinical oncology is the development of a cheap device capable of monitoring in real-time the concentration of a drug in the blood of a patient. This would allow fine-tuning the dosage according to the patient's metabolism, a key condition to reduce side effects. By using surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy we here show that short peptides designed in silico by a recently developed algorithm are capable of binding the anticancer drug irinotecan (CPT-11) with micromolar affinity. Importantly, the recognition takes place in the denaturating solution used in standard therapeutic drug monitoring to detach the drug from the proteins that are present in human plasma, and some of the peptides are capable of distinguishing CPT-11 from its metabolite SN-38. These results suggest that the in silico design of small artificial peptides is now a viable route for designing sensing units, opening a wide range of applications in diagnostic and clinical areas.

Peptide biosensors for anticancer drugs: Design in silico to work in denaturizing environment

Guida, Filomena;Gladich, Ivan;Buzzo, Mauro;Giodini, Luciana;Toffoli, Giuseppe;Laio, Alessandro;Berti, Federico
2018

Abstract

One of the main targets in current clinical oncology is the development of a cheap device capable of monitoring in real-time the concentration of a drug in the blood of a patient. This would allow fine-tuning the dosage according to the patient's metabolism, a key condition to reduce side effects. By using surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy we here show that short peptides designed in silico by a recently developed algorithm are capable of binding the anticancer drug irinotecan (CPT-11) with micromolar affinity. Importantly, the recognition takes place in the denaturating solution used in standard therapeutic drug monitoring to detach the drug from the proteins that are present in human plasma, and some of the peptides are capable of distinguishing CPT-11 from its metabolite SN-38. These results suggest that the in silico design of small artificial peptides is now a viable route for designing sensing units, opening a wide range of applications in diagnostic and clinical areas.
14-set-2017
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https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S095656631730619X
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11368/2929432
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