Aims: The aims of the study were (a) to assess whether the proportion of female nurses and female physicians in a given unit influences the attitude of collaboration between nurses and physicians as reported by nurses, and (b) to examine how these two dimensions interact to influence attitudes towards cooperation. Background: Available studies have documented that gender influences the collaboration between physicians and nurses, but no have explored the influence of specific combinations—such as a high proportion of female nurses and a high proportion of female physicians. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 700 nurses working in 36 hospital units in Italy. The validated Italian version of the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes towards Physician–Nurse Collaboration was used. A three stages hierarchical linear regression was performed by entering: (a) the control variables at the individual and at the unit levels, (b) the proportion of female nurses and physicians and (c) the two-way interaction. Results: A total of 430 nurses participated; the average Jefferson Scale of Attitudes towards Physician–Nurse Collaboration total score was 48.64 ± 5.27. At the second and third stages of the hierarchical linear regression model (explaining 12.8% and 14.1% of the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes towards Physician–Nurse Collaboration variance, respectively), having more female RNs as staff (model two: ß = 0.61, p =<.1; model three: ß = 0.69, p =<.05) was significantly associated with higher Jefferson Scale of Attitudes towards Physician–Nurse Collaboration scores; differently, higher physician–nurse ratios (model two: ß = −4.09, p =<.05; model three: ß = −4.54, p =<.01), and more female physicians (model two: ß = −1.06, p =<.05; model three: ß = −1.29, p =<.01) were associated with lower Jefferson Scale of Attitudes towards Physician–Nurse Collaboration scores. Conclusion: There is a decreased collaboration as reported by nurses when predominantly male nursing teams interact with teams with more female physicians. However, in units lead by female physicians, having more female members among the nursing team, ensures increased attitudes of collaboration as reported by nurses. Implications for Nursing Management: With the increasing proportion of female physicians and male nurses, unit mangers should be prepared to manage their influence on interprofessional cooperation.

Gender issues in physician–nurse collaboration in healthcare teams: Findings from a cross-sectional study

Pittino D.;Bortoluzzi G.;Palese A.
;
GARLATTI COSTA, GRAZIA
2019-01-01

Abstract

Aims: The aims of the study were (a) to assess whether the proportion of female nurses and female physicians in a given unit influences the attitude of collaboration between nurses and physicians as reported by nurses, and (b) to examine how these two dimensions interact to influence attitudes towards cooperation. Background: Available studies have documented that gender influences the collaboration between physicians and nurses, but no have explored the influence of specific combinations—such as a high proportion of female nurses and a high proportion of female physicians. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 700 nurses working in 36 hospital units in Italy. The validated Italian version of the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes towards Physician–Nurse Collaboration was used. A three stages hierarchical linear regression was performed by entering: (a) the control variables at the individual and at the unit levels, (b) the proportion of female nurses and physicians and (c) the two-way interaction. Results: A total of 430 nurses participated; the average Jefferson Scale of Attitudes towards Physician–Nurse Collaboration total score was 48.64 ± 5.27. At the second and third stages of the hierarchical linear regression model (explaining 12.8% and 14.1% of the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes towards Physician–Nurse Collaboration variance, respectively), having more female RNs as staff (model two: ß = 0.61, p =<.1; model three: ß = 0.69, p =<.05) was significantly associated with higher Jefferson Scale of Attitudes towards Physician–Nurse Collaboration scores; differently, higher physician–nurse ratios (model two: ß = −4.09, p =<.05; model three: ß = −4.54, p =<.01), and more female physicians (model two: ß = −1.06, p =<.05; model three: ß = −1.29, p =<.01) were associated with lower Jefferson Scale of Attitudes towards Physician–Nurse Collaboration scores. Conclusion: There is a decreased collaboration as reported by nurses when predominantly male nursing teams interact with teams with more female physicians. However, in units lead by female physicians, having more female members among the nursing team, ensures increased attitudes of collaboration as reported by nurses. Implications for Nursing Management: With the increasing proportion of female physicians and male nurses, unit mangers should be prepared to manage their influence on interprofessional cooperation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2957344
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