Surgical site infection in implant-based breast reconstruction is a complication with variable incidence reported in the literature. Due to potential loss of implant and reconstruction, it can have a strong psychological impact on patients. Background and objectives: This study aimed primarily at analyzing the current status of the surgical site infection (SSI), (type, time of onset, clinical presentation, pathogens and management) in patients who underwent implant-based breast reconstruction at our Breast Unit. Secondarily, we wanted to establish whether introduction of a new, updated evidence-based protocol for infection prevention can reduce SSI in implant-based breast reconstruction. Materials and Methods: A single-center retrospective study was performed primarily to evaluate the incidence and features of SSI after implant-based breast reconstruction from 2007 to 2020. In June 2020, a protocol for prevention of SSI in implant-based breast reconstruction was introduced in clinical practice. Secondarily, a data analysis of all patients who underwent implant-based breast reconstruction in compliance with this protocol was performed after preliminarily assessing its efficacy. Results: 756 women were evaluated after mastectomy and implant-based breast reconstruction for breast cancer. A total of 26 surgical site infections were detected. The annual incidence of SSI decreased over time (range 0–11.76%). Data relating to infections’ features, involved pathogens and implemented treatments were obtained. Since the introduction of the protocol, 22 patients have been evaluated, for a total of 29 implants. No early infections occurred. Conclusions: Surgical site infection rates at our Breast Unit are comparable to those reported in the literature. The SSI rates have shown a decreasing trend over the years. No SSI has occurred since the introduction of the prevention protocol for surgical site infection in June 2020.

Protocol for prevention and monitoring of surgical site infections in implant-based breast reconstruction: Preliminary results

Papa G.;Frasca A.
;
Renzi N.;Stocco C.;Pizzolato G.;Ramella V.;Arnez Z. M.
2021-01-01

Abstract

Surgical site infection in implant-based breast reconstruction is a complication with variable incidence reported in the literature. Due to potential loss of implant and reconstruction, it can have a strong psychological impact on patients. Background and objectives: This study aimed primarily at analyzing the current status of the surgical site infection (SSI), (type, time of onset, clinical presentation, pathogens and management) in patients who underwent implant-based breast reconstruction at our Breast Unit. Secondarily, we wanted to establish whether introduction of a new, updated evidence-based protocol for infection prevention can reduce SSI in implant-based breast reconstruction. Materials and Methods: A single-center retrospective study was performed primarily to evaluate the incidence and features of SSI after implant-based breast reconstruction from 2007 to 2020. In June 2020, a protocol for prevention of SSI in implant-based breast reconstruction was introduced in clinical practice. Secondarily, a data analysis of all patients who underwent implant-based breast reconstruction in compliance with this protocol was performed after preliminarily assessing its efficacy. Results: 756 women were evaluated after mastectomy and implant-based breast reconstruction for breast cancer. A total of 26 surgical site infections were detected. The annual incidence of SSI decreased over time (range 0–11.76%). Data relating to infections’ features, involved pathogens and implemented treatments were obtained. Since the introduction of the protocol, 22 patients have been evaluated, for a total of 29 implants. No early infections occurred. Conclusions: Surgical site infection rates at our Breast Unit are comparable to those reported in the literature. The SSI rates have shown a decreasing trend over the years. No SSI has occurred since the introduction of the prevention protocol for surgical site infection in June 2020.
Pubblicato
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7915384/
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/2991361
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